MTB How To Video: Coaching Marzocchi’s Bryson Martin.

Video clip of Gene Hamilton coaching Bryson Martin at Bootleg Canyon. Gene is excited to coach such a faster racer with a poor skills foundation! He took third two weeks ago behind winner, BetterRide coached Mitch Ropelato and 2nd place finisher Mikey Sylvestry yet he can’t corner (and found out today is vision skills needed some work as well as body position and vision!). With his dedication to learning, doing drills to master those skills and training hard he will be a threat this year.

Notice he carries enough speed to clear the step up after the rollers! The only racers I have coached that have cleared that are Mitch Ropelato and Andrew Pierce (and my asst. coach Greg Minnaar. Once Bryson added his legs into to the pump and got is vision dialed he was flying!

Downhill Video from the Nevada State Championships Downhill Race featuring many of my students.

Cool Video from the Nevada State Championships Downhill Race featuring many of my students. Look for these Betterride athletes: pro winners, Mitch Ropelato, Jackie Harmony, Jr. Cat 1 winner Cody Kelly, 7th place pro finisher Jon Widen and a host of racers tearing it up. My future student (in this weekends DH camp) 3rd place pro finisher Bryson Martin is also featured.

MTB Videos: Coaching World Champ Ross Schnell in Sedona

I am so fortunate to coach such a diverse group of riders. From eager, passionate riders just getting into the sport to World Champions like Ross Schnell they all need to master the same core skills that 20 years of riding will not help you stumble upon.
Notice how he is staying centered on his bike (weight on the pedals) and in a neutral position so we be smooth, maintain his momentum and keep his wheels on the ground.
Ross is balanced, using counter pressure to lean the bike, looking through the turn and back on the gas before he exits the second corner!
Here the corners are steeper and tighter but Ross is still managing to stay low, centered and neutral. In this one he should of slowed down a bit more and finished his braking before the left hand turn to generate more exit speed.

Andy’s Take On Some Great Counter Intuitive MTB Riding Advice

“Gotta go slow to go fast!” (this for all riders, especially those more concerned with control than speed, please read on!)
So here are two guys that pay (or used to pay) their rent by going faster – not by slowing down – telling us we need to slow down to go fast? What gives?
In the following, we’ll explore what the saying actually means and how it can help not only racers, but also recreational riders ride more efficiently, more in control, safer, and, faster.
every time we descend on the bike, its an exercise in momentum management. Every corner we take, every rock or root we drop off, etc. Every time we almost get thrown over the handlebars by improperly negotiating an obstacle, its because we screwed up on managing our momentum.
So I find it kind of amazing that very few riders look at riding a section of trail in terms of momentum management.
So sometime on a future ride, do this: look at sections of trail purely in terms of momentum. Use momentum as your tool to generate speed. Use momentum as your tool to clean obstacles. Think/look “outside the box” and don’t feel the need to follow the typical lines of the trail. Chances are, you’ll start to see things quite differently. You will start to “go slow to go fast” and reap the benefits of managing your momentum. If done correctly – and when combined with other proper techniques such as proper use of vision, body position, etc – instead of fighting the forces of physics in order to hold a particular line or drastically increasing or cutting speed, you’ll start to instead “flow” with the trail.

Great downhill mtb video, containing some great advice!

Great World Cup and US Open highlights. Check out Mitch’s crash in the Giant Slalom and the interview with US Open Downhill Winner Andrew Neethling. Listen to what Andrew says about slowing down to win the race! Something I stress with so many of my students, fast in doesn’t always mean fast out, sometimes you gotta go slow to go fast.