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Austin Gooder Downeville

Mountain Bike Way Better! Guaranteed!

Wow, what timing. We have been trying to simply explain why there is no other mountain bike coaching like BetterRide and why our students love us so much and then we got this email from a potential student (and yes, we wish all mountain bike riders were as astute as this guy):

“I’m thinking about taking the three day camp, but I have a couple questions. I have taken other training sessions with other organizations and they seem more like a group ride, which is not what I’m looking for. Are yours actual training and instruction? How many kids per instructor? I have taken scuba and kayak group trainings and they are painful. I see the benefit in watching and learning from others successes and failures, but I don’t want to be sitting in a line of 20 people waiting my turn wasting time. I guess I just want to make sure I’m getting the bang for my buck. Also, is women’s only training the same? My spouse may be interested if I’m successful. Thanks”

Our reply, “Thanks for writing.   I LOVE your email.   You will love our camp.  We teach a 19-21 hour curriculum spread over three days that is a large quantity of specific theories and drills that add up to the core skills of mountain biking.  We don’t just show you good riding or even just tell you to have proper body position.  We teach specific drills that will make things like proper body position become automatic for you on the bike. (you have to do the drills though!) We offer a money back guarantee if this is not the best investment you ever made in your riding.  We aren’t out to create the funnest three days for you, we strive to make those three days the best use of your time towards drastically improving your bike handling skills. The women’s curriculum is largely the same as the Co-ed camps.  Most co-ed camps have multiple women in them.  We coach 8 students at a time (occasionally 11- 14 with a second coach).

Gabe

Better Ride”

His reply to our email: “Gabe, thanks for all the info. Sounds like this is exactly what I want. I consider myself an advanced beginner rider that can’t turn. I’m still trying to find something or someone that has something negative to say about these camps and I can’t. So I will be signing up for one in the next couple months, just need to pick the place. I’m in Phoenix, but would not be opposed to going somewhere close.”

Well, that pretty much sums it up, structured, drill based coaching, low rider coach ratio and no bad reviews! (tons of extremely positive ones though) We really want to help you mountain bike way better and get even more enjoyment out of your riding and/or racing. Our money back guarantee and glowing reviews from riders just like you*, riders way better than you**, other coaches*** and riders not as good as you are testament to our passion for coaching. Do yourself a favor and sign up for a three day skills progression today!

** World Champ Ross Schnell, “I learned more today than in my 11 year career”

**National Champ and World Cup podium finisher Mitch Ropelato in an interview with Dirt Magazine

Dirt Magazine: “You seem to be able to turn amazingly, what do you put that down to? Got any special tires on there?

Mitch Ropelato: ” Ya, Gene Hamilton is to thank for that, I took is clinic last December in Bootleg Canyon and he was able to show me the correct technique I needed to pull them off.”

 

 

Students Doing Cornering Drills To Ingrain Skills Before Hitting the Trails

Students Doing Cornering Drills To Ingrain Skills Before Hitting the Trails

* Here is what two passionate riders had to say after one of our camps:

Hi Gene,

Thank you for creating what has been one of the best learning experiences of our lives.  We traveled all the way from Australia to attend your camp in Golden, Colorado and it was worth every penny! Andy was a fantastic teacher with great personal skills. He has our highest commendation for creating a safe, exciting and fun environment for learning.

It is refreshing to find someone who understands their field well enough to be able to deconstruct difficult and often hard to pinpoint concepts. This is a rare talent. We appreciate all of the careful thought that you and Andy have put into creating the mountain bike skills curriculum. The content was well-organized into different sections, and logically progressed from foundational skills (like body position and braking) to more difficult skills (like cornering). It is obvious that you have spent a lot of time not only thinking about how to mountain bike, but also how to teach it to others.

Learning these mountain biking skills has truly made us “betterriders”.  Thank you for the opportunity to attend your camp and we look forward to attending a core skills camp #2 !

Sincerely,

Tracy and Matt from Canberra, Australia      September 28, 2010

*** Another coach’s perspective:

“Gene,

      I took your Core Skills clinic from Andy and Chip 2 years ago and it changed everything about my riding. Without going further I want to thank you sincerely. My riding is more fun, safer, faster, in more control, and better in all ways because of you. I wear your shirt and bumper stickers proudly and tell anyone that sits still for too long about it. Since then I’ve purchased multiple books and taken multiple skills clinics. I recently got certified by IMBA as a level 2 instructor and teach for Boulder Mountainbike Alliance. After all that I finally feel ready to take a Core Skills 2 in 2014 (near Boulder?? please!!…;) In all the clinics I’ve taken and all the books I’ve read (2 from Lee and 1 from Shaums) it’s your class that has been the standard that no one else has reached. I’m totally psych’d to hear you finally plan to write a book. Sign me up for a copy, no matter the price.

David Holshouser”    from an email dated Oct. 19, 2013

 

Cedric Gracia, World Cup Mountain Bike Racer, Rock Star?

Mountain Bike Much Better in 2 Minutes!

Mountain Bike Much Better in 2 Minutes! A quick, easy and fun exercise you can do pre-mtb ride that will make you ride at the best of your ability level. The “Power Pose”?

A student just forwarded me a skydiving article that covered a mental tip I have been teaching our students to do for years! I never new the exact science but I knew it worked (thanks to something I had learned from Tony Robbins).
Read more

Mountain Biking and Coffee, and Beer?

Mountain Biking and coffee go together like mountain biking and beer!

Ever wonder how coffee (or any other caffeine filled stimulant, Redbull, Monster, various teas, etc) gives you energy? I have, being extremely caffeine sensitive I only use it a few times a month for the powerful drug that it is (it really helps me focus when I am trying to get stuff done!). Many of our coaches and students however can’t get through the day without a cup (or six of coffee), especially if they plan on mountain biking. I found an interesting article on how caffeine doesn’t actually give us energy (which makes sense, energy come from the right combination of exercise and recovery, how could something give you energy?) it is all in the mind! The article also talks about how mountain bikers second favorite beverage, beer affects us too.

Before I get to the article though a few reasons caffeine can be bad for mountain biking and some experiments you may want to try.

1. Caffeine can make you jittery and tense causing you to not ride as smooth and relaxed as you can without it, this often counters the extra energy effect as you are now less efficient and possibly even a little clumsy.  With no caffeine in your system practice trackstands for a few minutes and note your longest, calmest trackstand. Then drink your caffeine of choice, wait 15 minutes and practice trackstands again. After the caffeine can your trackstand longer? Are you more or less twitchy on your bike after the caffeine?

2. Caffeine allows you work a little harder than your body really wants to work. This can be good by pushing you to new heights on your mountain bike but can also lead to feeling sluggish or worn out and next day and possibly even over training your body if you don’t manage your recovery. I once heard a trainer describe using caffeine as “borrowing energy from tomorrow”! After reading the following article I believe he may be right!

https://ooomf.com/blog/coffee-vs-beer-effects-on-creativity/

What has been your experience with caffeine and riding? Do you drink beer while or after riding?

A Quick Mountain Bike Tip to Improve Technical Climbing

A Quick Mountain Bike Tip to Improve Technical Climbing  article by Gene Hamilton

Climbing is an often over looked skill in mountain biking, we often assume more power will do the job, which is not always true.   This article is about picking a line that works! For physical climbing skills Andy Winohradsky wrote a great article on climbing skill here:  http://betterride.net/?p=1426

One instinct, especially when not looking far enough ahead is to avoid obstacles. This often leads to “micro-managing the trail” and taking twisty paths that are much longer and often harder to ride than going over the obstacle.  When turning, your rear wheel tracks inside of your front wheel so you can hang the rear wheel or derailleur up on a rock, you can lose traction as you try to cut across the fall line and then turn back up it, your pedal clips a rock as you apply power or your line itself has less traction causing you to stall. In the photo below it is actually easier, faster and more efficient to go straight up the rock (in this case the rock acts as a paved ramp, great traction!) than weave around it in the lose sand.

 

Ride over the rock, it is easier.

 

Have you ever made it part way through a rock garden by avoiding obstacle one and two and then get trapped behind obstacle three, or stall while trying to wiggle between obstacle two and three? This often happens because we are not looking far enough ahead and will instinctively avoid obstacles if there is a clear path to the right and/or left of the obstacle. Unfortunately this sets us up for failure, often if we tackle the first obstacle the rest of the rock garden will be easy! Check out my amazing drawing skills in this Paint document I created!

 

Mountain Bike Rock Garden

 

I see this all the time on Rustlers Loop in Fruita. Instead of going up the “gut” of a rock move riders avoid the rock (avoiding the rock  is faster and easier for 7-10 feet) then they have to wheelie while turning over a bigger edge of the same rock (something that is nearly impossible to do). Going straight up the rock (which often looks tricky or rough) is faster and easier in the long run run. Both examples above require simple, core skills, nothing “special”, an effortless wheelie, correct weight placement and good vision skills.

Lastly, weaving takes our momentum across the fall line (the fall line is the path a ball would roll) instead of up it. Once our momentum is going sideways it is often really hard to getting it going straight up again, you can lose your balance, spin out or simply stall as you try to head up the hill again.

When climbing technical sections the fastest and easiest path is often the straightest! Avoid the temptation to weave as it usually ends poorly. Focus on the line with the fewest direction changes and the best traction.

Note: I use the word “often” in this how to mtb article because there are way too many variables in mountain biking to say, “always do …”, in this case, sometimes a weaving path is better, it all depends on the trail.