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Stop being one with your bike!

Stop Being One With Your Bike! (Mountain Bike Better Today.)

Stop Being One With Your Bike! Mountain Bike Better Today.

The most common mistake I see riders making is being one with their bikes. You don’t want to do what your bike is doing! Ever get “eyeball jiggle” (when your eyes are bouncing and you can’t focus on the trail)? Ever feel like the trail is bucking you or that you handlebars are being yanked out of your hands? These are all symptoms of being one with your bike. Mentally you may want to be one with your bike but not physically! Watch a skilled rider go through a rough section of trail, their bike is all over the place (wheels bouncing, rear end kicking up, frame jerking up, down and sideways) but their chest and head are barely moving! This is because they are letting the bike move beneath them, being “separate” from their bike.

What causes you to be one with your bike (other than bad advice)? Fear, your instinct to move away from danger, riding above your skill level (riding a trail you are not confident to ride or riding faster than you are comfortable), lack of knowledge of proper body position (or knowledge of proper body position but not using proper body position because you haven’t ingrained proper body position with deliberate practice) all lead to being stiff and one with your bike. This leads to locked arms, stiff legs, possibly squeezing the seat with your thighs and bouncing all over the trail.

How do you fix this? Relax! Muscle tension causes your body to be stiff making it hard to absorb shock and let the bike move beneath you. The best mountain bike suspension ever made is your body! Your legs and arms have way more than 8” of suspension travel and that travel is instantaneous and well dampened (no need to adjust compression or rebound). So relax and use your body! How do you relax? Smile, smiling releases endorphins which relax us! Ride with a loose grip on the bars, death griping the bars effectively locks your arms with muscle tension (muscle tension also robs you of energy). Ride trails you can confidently ride! Riding trails that scare you will not make you better! Scary trails will make you feel less confident and lucky, when not confident you resort to survival instincts (like braking in a corner when going to fast or straightening out your arms while shifting your weight back when scared), not proper skills. Here is a photo of Ned, one of our students “driving his bike past a rider relying on instincts and being “one with his bike”. Notice how Ned is separate from his bike, centered and neutral.

Stop being one with your bike! Mountain bike better today

Ned “driving” his bike, separated, balanced and ready for what ever the trail throws at him.

Next, bend those elbows and knees to put you in a neutral position. Suspension has “sag” for a reason, your fork and rear suspension (if you have suspension) move both up and down to keep your wheels on the ground. You need to do the same! With straight arms and legs you can absorb upward forces but you will get yanked down small ledges as you “plop” down instead of gently rolling down. An excellent way to feel this and a drill to help ingrain this is: Find a set of stairs that you can comfortably roll down (not scary to you!). Roll down those stair with your arms straight, squeezing the seat your thighs while death griping the bars. Then roll down those stairs a second time smiling with your knees bent, elbows bent into a half push up position, knees bent, a loose grip on the bars and a lowered seat. You will be amazed at the difference! Once you feel how much better it is to be relaxed and supple practice this on stairs, rock ledges, bumpy sections of trail, etc. Really focus on one aspect of this (loose grip or knees bent or smiling or elbows bent, etc.) and practice until you can’t get it wrong! Remember, “Amateurs practice until they get it right, pros practice until they can’t get it wrong! Here is a great shot of Austin with knees and elbows bent, separate from his bike and completely in control!

Stop being one with your bike!

BetterRide student Austin Gooder riding with great form in Downeville

For more on body position and video showing both poor, “one with your bike” position and good separate from your bike position check out this blog post: http://betterride.net/blog/2010/mountain-bike-desending-body-position-101-video-demonstration/

I hope this has helped. Now put down your computer and go practice!

Shawn Neer, Downhill switchback in Pemberton, BC

Some Mountain Bike Companies and Shops Want To Hurt You!

Some Mountain Bike Companies and Shops Want To Hurt You! Sounds unbelievable but it is true, James Wilson recently wrote this: ”

So what would you say if I told you that a major bike manufacturer was shipping all of their mountain bikes with a sticker that told riders not to use flat pedals? What if the sticker literally said that their bikes are supposed to be equipped only with toe-clips or clipless pedals?

And what if I told you that no one at that company can seem to explain why it is there? What if the company had been caught in several lies and that they were actually misquoting and misrepresenting laws in defense of the sticker?

And what if all of this was taking place while a lot of people in the mountain bike industry stood by and said nothing, deciding instead that a pro-clipless/ anti-flats sticker with no factual reason to be there wasn’t really a big deal?

Well, you’d probably call me paranoid and crazy. And, up until a few months ago, I would have agreed with you.

But then someone posted a picture on Facebook and I got sucked into a story that I still find hard to believe. Unfortunately, though, it did happen and the easiest way to start this off is to outline the events in the order they took place…

- A picture of a sticker was attached to one of my Facebook posts. The person who posted it said that it was off of a Trek mountain bike and that all of their mountain bikes – including their DH bike – were being shipped with them on the cranks. The sticker read:

“This bicycle is to be equipped with pedals that have a positive foot-retaining device such as toe-clips or clipless type pedals.”" More from James here: http://www.bikejames.com/strength/why-is-trek-putting-an-anti-flats-sticker-on-their-mountain-bikes/

How crazy is that? Toe-clips?! I can’t think of a more dangerous pedal type! Even clipless are quite dangerous until you train your feet/ankles to un-clip easily and consistently. Trek is openning themselves up to quite the lawsuit with this advice!

Here is an update on an article I wrote six years ago on pedals.

I get some version of the following question at least once a month and as I have continued to ride and learn my feelings on this subject have evolved.

“I do have a question, I’ve only been riding for 3 months, at what point do you think I should get clips? I’m not sure I am ready for them but I notice the people I ride with are all clipped in and they are so much faster than me. Is that a big factor in speed?

Thanks,
Ada”

This is a great question.  First you never have to get clipless pedals.  Clipless pedals (the ones you clip into) are simply a different way of doing things, barely better in some ways, not as good in other ways.  I have heard from students who say that their local shop told them they need clipless pedals and nothing could be further from the truth.  A good set of flat pedals and sticky soled shoes is a better system for many riders.

Yes, I usually ride clipped in but it took me a lot of time to get used to clipping in and out and a lot of time to get used to riding clipped in (a year before I became honestly as comfortable being clipped in as I was on flats!).  The more I ride, coach and learn the more I see the advantages of flat pedals.  I have been riding flat pedals the last few weeks and each day I like them more.

Pros of running flat pedals (with 5.10 Shoes)

Some Mountain Bike Compaines and shops want to hurt you!

Thin Flat pedals like the Canfield Brothers Crampon with 5.10 shoes is a great combination!

1. More Confidence! You can take your feet off quickly and easily making trying technical sections and learning important skills like track standing easier. I have a lot of friends who always ride flat pedals (for cross country riding) and like being able to put a foot down at will.  They say this enables them to try more technical moves and sections (especially going uphill) that they would be to scared to try clipped in.

2. Less fear for many riders (which allows the rider to stay in their comfort zone and relax!).  Fear and learning do not mix, you can not learn when scared.  Muscle Tension (which fear produces) and riding do not mix well either.

3. Flat pedals provide more feedback, giving you an idea of how you are riding. Because you are not attached to the pedals if you are riding stiff and relying on your suspension to soak up the bumps (instead of using your body) you will notice that your feet bounce all over the pedals. This is a sign that you should be more relaxed and supple on the trail.

4. Flat pedals don’t allow you to cheat when doing lifting maneuvers such as rear wheel lifts and bunny hops. This can be valuable when learning proper technique. “Proper technique” is in control, in balance and much more efficient than “muscling” or yanking your way over the obstacle.

Pros of being clipped in:

Steve Peat cornering hard and fast while clipped in!

Steve Peat cornering hard and fast while clipped in!

1. I like clips for the “attached” to my bike feel (although they have made me less smooth because of this). When you foot lands with the heel or instep on the pedal (instead of the ball of your foot) you lose the use of your ankle (which is a big part of your shock absorption) and you start plowing into the trail instead of floating smoothly.  So being attached to your pedal keeps you on the ball of your foot no matter how stiff you ride. This is the main reason I and World Champion Greg Minnaar clip in, downhill tracks are rough and it is easy when running flat pedals to have your foot bounce and end up in an awkward place on the pedal.

2. Being clipped does make pedaling a little more efficient.  Again let me repeat myself, a little more efficient, there have been no studies done that I know of.  If pedaling at 100% efficient vs. 99 or 98% efficient is more important to you than having a little more confidence clipped in might be for you. Remember, being efficient on mountain biking is more than just pedaling, smoothness, cornering ability and confidence will also help you become more efficient.  Turns out I was wrong about that, I still haven’t found a study that shows that clipless pedals or more efficient, I did find an article that shows that “pulling up on the backstroke” is a less-efficient way to pedal (it adds power at the sake of efficiency). Study here: http://wp.me/p49ApH-73

3. Being clipped in encourages you to ride and corner with correct technique and body position keeping your feet on the pedals (usually when you take a foot off your pedals you end up in an out of balance position often causing a slide out). World Champion Greg Minnaar always uses clips when racing in the mud for this reason. He said in one of our camps, “with flat pedals you take your foot out instinctively, often when you don’t need to and putting your out of position. Riding clipped in forces me to stay in balance and use proper technique”.

4. Although clipless pedals may not be more efficient they do allow you to produce more power by pulling up. This can be handy when you are climbing a super steep, challenging trail and need that extra power to help you get over the top! Sure, it isn’t quite as efficient but at that point making the climb is more efficient than stalling!

Which pedal type should you use?  Experiment!  find which pedal system you fill most comfortable on and confident riding on.

After 18 years of riding clipped in 99% of the time I now really enjoy being unclipped about 30% of the time. Riding flat pedals keeps me honest (efficient, smooth and relying on technique instead of power)!

Flat or clipless pedals are simply a different way of doing things neither is better than the other and clipless pedals are certainly not an upgrade!

BetterRide founder Gene Hamilton explaining one of many important aspects of cornering to our students.

BetterRide Mountain Bike School On TV, Again!

Wow, I didn’t even know about this until it came up in my news feed! BetterRide Mountain Bike School On TV, Again! Not as in depth or as far reaching as our Discovery Channel special in 2004 but cool never the less!

http://www.nbc11news.com/home/headlines/Moutnain-Bike-clinics-help-with-safety-277285731.html

 

BetterRide Mountain Bike Skills Coaching on TV!

BetterRide Mountain Bike Skills Coaching on TV!

 

bama cornering

Mountain Bike Coaching. The best pro in the sport taught them wrong!

Often the best athletes in a sport don’t make the best coaches. I was reading the book Blink the other day and it talked about Andre Aggassi’s advice on how he puts so much top spin on the ball. When explaining it to his coach and other coaches he stated that by turning his wrist over as he hit the ball it gave him the top spin. Well the coaches believed this (after all Andre was one of the best players in the world) and started teaching their students this. Well, an interesting thing happened, there was a huge rise in wrist injuries among young tennis players. After careful motion analysis the coaches saw that Andre’s wrist never moved, the “top the ball motion” was actually generated at his shoulder not his wrist.

Reading this reminded me of all the movements in riding that I now explain quite differently than I did 5-15 years ago. The skill hasn’t changed but after years of study I realized that I was often explaining the outcome of doing it correctly but not the actual fundamental skill. Effective coaching involves breaking skills down and being able to explain them to a diverse group of people. Then the goal isn’t to just convey knowledge but to get the rider to actually do the skill, correctly,  in ALL situations. We must explain and demonstrate how to do the skill, why/when to do the skill, how it should feel, all explained 3-4 ways so riders with different learning skills and backgrounds ALL understand.  One of the most fun aspects of my job is after 20 years of coaching I am still learning how to explain skills better. The learning of skills continues too, after 15 years of coaching mountain biking I am still learning a lot of little details on how to do skills better/easier/with less effort.

Mountain Bike Coaching

BetterRide Coach Chip assisting students in a cornering drill designed to ingrain the right habits.

It is great to see Mountain Bike Coaching catching on, good for riders and good for the sport. Unfortunately, like all professions there are great coaches, good coaches, ok coaches and outright dangerous coaches. Often the best coaches aren’t the best athletes, the athletes that had passion but not the physical gifts often study the sport more as they have to make up for their physical short comings with better technique. With this in mind I finally realized that my asthma was a blessing as it forced me to find the most efficient way to ride a bike if I wanted to be competitive against riders with much larger lungs. This plus years of being coached, going to coaching schools, reading all I could and 20 years of coaching experience has really helped me design an effective curriculum that has benefited World Champions and riders just like you.

The moral of the story, don’t believe everything you hear, even it comes from an “expert”.