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mountain biking too much

Mountain Biking Too Much?

For most of my thirties and forties I was mountain biking too much! How can that be you ask? Well, let me explain.

From the time I did my first race until very recently I was completely obsessed with mountain biking, it was my life. I moved into my van and took my summers off from work to race and train full time. Then I spent my winters coaching snowboarding during the day and DJing nightclubs at night to pay off all the debt I racked up in the summers chasing my pro racing dreams. I didn’t have time for things I used to love. Couldn’t go skateboarding (might get hurt and not be able to ride), no time for playing in rivers and creeks (all my time was spent training or recovering), not much time for a social life (have to go to bed early to recover and feel rested) basically, little to no time that wasn’t mountain bike focused. Eventually I quit snowboarding and moved to Boulder, CO to ride year round. Another way of thinking about this was I was completely focused on the future (except when riding) and often didn’t fundamentally enjoy my day to day existence. Don’t get the impression I was depressed or sad doing this, at the time I loved it, but, it was all I knew. Life can be better! I didn’t do intervals because I enjoyed the feeling of getting stronger and faster, I did them so I could hopefully win a race six to 12 months in the future. Oh, and you know what I did EVERYDAY? I rode my bike! For most of us, mountain biking is an escape, for me it was an everyday routine, that surprisingly I didn’t burnout on until years of doing this.

To some of you this might sound like a dream life and at the time, for me, it was a dream life. Looking back though, I missed out on a lot and became very unbalanced. Compare this to some of my former teammates like Ryan Sutton and Kain Leonard who were not only much faster than me, they had more balanced lives than I had. They spent the winters skiing and snowboarding, they made time for a social life. In the summers they still played off their bikes, playing in rivers, riding dirt bikes and they maintained a social life, sometimes, gasp, they missed a big race to stay home with their girlfriends. I remember thinking, “you’re missing your big chance! You could make it as a sponsored athlete!”. Kain is now married to that girlfriend and they have two kids, probably worth missing a race or two for that!

Would you miss family reunions for a bike race? I did, many of them and a few dear friends’ and close relatives’ weddings too. All so I could race my over priced kids toys! Are my three World Masters Championship medals worth all I sacrificed to get them? No way! Standing on those podiums was glorious, but, really, who cares? I honestly don’t even know where those medals are right now. Racing mountain bikes is great if you have the life balance that my teammates did or the balance of Steve Peat (who has found the time to get married, have a child and from his videos do silly and fun things off his bike too).

 

mountain biking too much

In Third Place at the 1999 UCI World Masters Championships, a moment of glory not worth what I sacrificed to get there.

I remember feeling guilty when I didn’t ride, sometimes I still do, “you’re a mountain bike coach, you should be out riding!”. Where, I know this might sound blasphemous but there is a lot more to life than riding bikes. Don’t be like me, focus on a healthy, balanced life and keep mountain biking as a healthy part of that life. Make time for friends, play in rivers, go surfing, travel without your bike, attend friends’ weddings and keep mountain biking special, not something you must do everyday. I realize that mountain biking can be addicting, for me and for most “lifestyle” riders it is our meditation (the only time time our busy minds go quiet and we are actually living in the moment) and that it keeps us sane and happy but, relax, learn to actually meditate and make time for friends, family and other pursuits.

 

Enduro Camp

Mountain Biking, Make Skill Improvements Stick! Forever! Starting Now!

When mountain biking we often overlook crucial mental skills that help us use our physical skills better and more confidently. The mistake we will work on today I have nicknamed, “Riding with Fully Rigid Eyes”.

I came up with the name, “Fully Rigid Eyes” when I realized I was looking at the trail with the same “eyes” as I did on my first mtb ride in 1989! It was 1998, nine years later and my skill and my equipment was head and shoulders better than it was in 1989 but I was looking at the trail like I did on that first ride (on a fully rigid mountain bike)!

Let me explain the situation and how you can use this to help make your mountain biking skill increases “stick” and become much more confident. From 1994-1998 (dates might be off my a year) the first downhill race of the year for me was down the Porcupine Rim Climb (Starting at the Top of “Lazy Man’s and finishing by the stock tanks on Sand Flats road). I always walk the trails I race and memorize them (where I do EVERYTHING, where I brake, where I let off the brakes, where it get’s rocky, the lines I take, where I shift, where I sprint, etc.) and to help remember the track I make up names for each section (the fast section, the steep section, the wooded section, etc). At this race there was a rock garden which I called the “gnarly section” and on my hardtail with 1.5″ of fork travel up front and a 120 mm stem it was kind of gnarly.  However, by 1998 I had a 6″ travel full suspension bike, a 60 mm stem and my skills were much better than in 1994 (and way better than in 1989!).

On to the race! There I was, blasting through the “Gnarly Section” on my sweet Yeti/Lawwill Straight 6 with a big grin on my face. As I crossed the finish line after my first run it occurred to me, it isn’t gnarly anymore! At this race I always got a minimum of ten practice runs and the promoter gave us two race runs so by my race run in 1998 I had 50 practice runs and 10 race runs on that track! In that time I never crashed in that “gnarly section”. If you can make something 60 times out of 60 attempts, it must not be too gnarly! But, I was still calling it the gnarly section! What do you think I was thinking as I railed the corner before it and said to myself, “here comes the gnarly section”? If you are thinking I might of tensed up a bit and slowed down a hair you are right! Why? With my improved skill and way, way better bike it was easy know! So I renamed it, “that fun, rocky section”. On my next run, as I railed the corner before the “fun, rocky section” instead of tensing up and slowing down I relaxed and threw in a few pedals! Five seconds faster and I moved up from 5th to 3rd!

You can put this into practice and make skill improvements stick and increase your confidence in you and your bike! Think about it, on a scale of 1-10 my skill from 1989 to 1998 had gone from a 1 to 7 and my bike had gone from a negative 1 to an 8, yet I was still looking at the trail like I was on that negative 1 bike with a skill level of 1! Don’t to this! It is hard not to do this though, do you have a rock like the one in the short video below or a section of trail that you have never made before? Well, you probably have a name for it, something like, “that gnarly section” or “widow maker” or that “f’ing. f’ing rock that always screws me up”. Well, let say your skills improve (because you took a BetterRide camp!) and now you ride that rock or section of trail for the first time. You didn’t get lucky, you know exactly how you did it, “I looked at the rock, spotted my line, looked to victory, manualed and shifted my weight” (just like in the video below). Well, now is the time to update your reptilian brain and make sure it knows how much better you have become!

Walk up to the rock/section of trail that used to riddle you and say to yourself, “wow, for 3/5/10 years I couldn’t make it over this rock, now it is easy, simply look at the rock, spot my line, look to victory, manual and shift my weight and I’m over it.” Then ride it again to cement in that it is now easy for you. This is a crucial step to making improvements stick! Think about it, for nine years I looked at the trail with the eyes of a beginner yet I had gone from beginner to pro racer! Simply because I had not upgraded my self-image as a mountain biker (despite great upgrading my skills and my bike!) I was not allowing myself to have the confidence I should of had!

A word of caution, often men feel they have way more skill than they actually do (especially when they are between 10 and 35ish) which is why about 90% of emergency room visits for traumatic physical injuries are young males, so over confidence is bad! Make sure your skill has honestly increased and your weren’t just lucky!

 

 

Luck vs. skill, update self image, crucial skill (that you can can start working on now!)

Mountain Bike Much Better in 2 Minutes!

Mountain Bike Much Better in 2 Minutes! A quick, easy and fun exercise you can do pre-mtb ride that will make you ride at the best of your ability level. The “Power Pose”?

A student just forwarded me a skydiving article that covered a mental tip I have been teaching our students to do for years! I never new the exact science but I knew it worked (thanks to something I had learned from Tony Robbins).
Read more

Mountain Biking and Coffee, and Beer?

Mountain Biking and coffee go together like mountain biking and beer!

Ever wonder how coffee (or any other caffeine filled stimulant, Redbull, Monster, various teas, etc) gives you energy? I have, being extremely caffeine sensitive I only use it a few times a month for the powerful drug that it is (it really helps me focus when I am trying to get stuff done!). Many of our coaches and students however can’t get through the day without a cup (or six of coffee), especially if they plan on mountain biking. I found an interesting article on how caffeine doesn’t actually give us energy (which makes sense, energy come from the right combination of exercise and recovery, how could something give you energy?) it is all in the mind! The article also talks about how mountain bikers second favorite beverage, beer affects us too.

Before I get to the article though a few reasons caffeine can be bad for mountain biking and some experiments you may want to try.

1. Caffeine can make you jittery and tense causing you to not ride as smooth and relaxed as you can without it, this often counters the extra energy effect as you are now less efficient and possibly even a little clumsy.  With no caffeine in your system practice trackstands for a few minutes and note your longest, calmest trackstand. Then drink your caffeine of choice, wait 15 minutes and practice trackstands again. After the caffeine can your trackstand longer? Are you more or less twitchy on your bike after the caffeine?

2. Caffeine allows you work a little harder than your body really wants to work. This can be good by pushing you to new heights on your mountain bike but can also lead to feeling sluggish or worn out and next day and possibly even over training your body if you don’t manage your recovery. I once heard a trainer describe using caffeine as “borrowing energy from tomorrow”! After reading the following article I believe he may be right!

https://ooomf.com/blog/coffee-vs-beer-effects-on-creativity/

What has been your experience with caffeine and riding? Do you drink beer while or after riding?