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Mountain Bike Climbing Video Tips (Back Pain Saver and Power Producer)

When I purchased my first two mountain bikes the guys at the shop told me to tilt my seat slightly toward the rear so I “would slide back to the more comfortable part of the saddle and take weight off my hands”. Turns out, they were right, if you only ride retaliative flat terrain! If you have long, steep climbs that setup can lead to back pain and greatly restrict your power output, by tilting your hips backward making it nearly impossible to hinge forward. This causes you to use lower back instead of your strong gluteus maximus and hips to power your climb.

Modern mountain bike design has greatly evolved over the last few years, finally getting longer reach measurements so we can be stable and use a nice short stem and the headangles have gotten slacker making descending much less scary! Two things I have been preaching for years here (see this article on the most confidence inspiring mountain bike: http://betterride.net/blog/2016/confidence-inspiring-mountain-bike-fun/  ). Most companies are still missing the final ingredient which is a steeper seat tube angle so we aren’t sitting over the rear wheel! My bike has 74 degree seat tube angle, while forward thinking companies like the Canfield Brothers Toir has 77 degree seat tube angle, putting your more over the bottom bracket than the rear tire. This makes climbing much easier! (by keeping your weight more centered so low don’t have to hinge way forward when climbing to keep the front wheel from lifting and so it doesn’t feel like you are pedaling forward like on a recumbent!)

Have you tried tilting your seat slightly forward and down? Slid your seat forward on the rails?  I would love to hear about your experiences or any questions you have! Please feel free to share this article with anyone you think would benefit from it.

Best Mountain Bike Video Ever?! Inspiring and Funny

Best Mountain Bike Video Ever?! Inspiring and Funny, if you didn’t see this this summer watch now, or watch it again for inspiration.

Martyn Ashton takes on the Fort William World Cup Downhill Track!

 

Mountain Biking The Whole Enchilada, Successfully

Mountain biking the Whole Enchilada (“WE” to save my fingers) is on many a rider’s “bucket list”, as it should be, it is one amazing ride! However, do the fact it is a “shuttle ride” and only approximately 27 miles long many people under estimate it. I want everyone to really enjoy this ride and avoid many of the mistakes riders make in tackling this ride.

Mountain biking the whole enchilada

Dave and I on top of the Burro Pass climb, 2008?

I have no idea what your fitness or skill level is but I just want to make sure you understand what you are getting into on this ride. 🙂

The WE is a long and very challenging ride! It takes great skill and great fitness. Every time I ride it I see people walking the first little rocky descent on the trail that takes you to the base of Burro Pass. This frightens me as the trail only gets much harder for the next 27 or so miles. It gets much steeper, rockier and rougher as well as having two tough climbs and a lot of short climbs, it is by no means downhill the whole way!

The first climb, about 10 minutes from where the shuttle drops you off starts at 10,300 feet and goes to 11,200 feet. That climb alone is more taxing than most entire mountain bike rides. Then the Burro Pass trail descent is steep! and ROUGH! This ride is unlike any ride most mountain bikers have done and probably 50% of riders attempting it are missing at least one vital component they need to finish, much less enjoy this ride.

Many people think (including me the first time I did this trail), “27 miles, I do that all the time! And this is a shuttle ride so it is mostly down hill!”. Well, a common saying in Moab is a mile in Moab equals two anywhere else and it is true. Moab is sandy and rocky, big, square edged rocks that are angled toward you. The pedaling is harder here as the sand and rocks rob your power and speed and the descending is rough also robbing your speed and fitness (your upper body will be as tired as your legs after this ride!).

Just past halfway at the famous view point. You start near the top of the La Sals behind you!

Just past halfway at the famous view point. You start near the top of the La Sals behind you!

Burro down (the original name of this ride) is best done by a skilled rider, who is very fit and on an “enduro” bike, all the steep sections are much easier on a bike with a slack head angle (67 degrees or less) wide bars (740-820mm) and a short stem (35mm to 60mm), a dropper post and at least 2.3, tubeless “trail tires” (with a thicker sidewall to resist cuts.punctures and pinch flats). Yes, people have done it on steep head angle hardtails but why? That’s like bringing a knife to a gun fight!

I’m not trying to scare you or act elitist but this ride no joke. It really scares me watching the unprepared and/or under skilled riders get off the shuttle and start this ride. Unless you are much fitter than me (which isn’t too hard to be these days!), the ride will take at minimum four hours but your “average rider” probably takes 6-8 hours to finish. Which means you also need a heavy pack with enough food and water for 4-8 hours of exercise in a hot, dry environment and enough clothing for the cold temps at 10,000-11,200 feet (where it could be snowing sideways). This fall we started at 2:30 pm (not the smartest thing we have ever done! 😉 ) and started catching people from the 10:00 am shuttle less than halfway through the ride! When we finished we had passed many riders from the 8:00 am shuttle and they looked like Zombies, many were out of water and walking their bikes.

Mountain biking the Whole Enchilada

View from the start of Kokopelli

Now, if you are either really fit (able to do a 50 mile mtb ride), really skilled or hopefully both this is one of the best rides in the World. Honestly though, my skills are better than they have ever been but my fitness isn’t what it used to be (not because of my age but because I simply don’t train as hard as I used to) and this ride works me, I am hammered at the end. It worked me when I was really fit too, as I went faster, so. no matter what your fitness level is it will probably wear you out.

For most riders, starting a little lower than Burro Pass is a blessing! It is still really fun from Hazard (trail) down or Kokopelli down. If that turns out to be well within your fitness and ability then ride the WE a day or two later. The nice thing about these two options is they open earlier in the year and stay open later as they start lower.

If you prepare for this ride it is a blast! Make sure you are in shape enough to ride a 50 mile mtb ride and have the skills to ride steep, technical trails and enjoy your ride!

Stop being one with your bike!

Mountain Bike Your Best, Every Ride, Mental & Physical Warm Up Plan

Ever struggle at the beginning of ride? Wish you could mountain bike your best, every ride? I received the following question from a student and it lead to a this article on warming up.

“I have a question about getting into the groove. It happens to me a lot that when I start out on a trail it takes a while for me to get into riding smoothly and comfortably. Even on trails I know very well. Sometimes it takes 20-30 minutes of riding before I feel comfortable. Darn good thing I’m an endurance racer and not a downhill racer, but it is frustrating. Can you give me some help as to how to overcome this? Is it common?
Karen”

This is quite common for many riders and I (and many of my students) have the same problem. I always like to warm up for at least 20 minutes before I hit the trail. For a trail ride or before my first downhill run of the day I usually warm up by doing my cornering and skills drills in a parking lot and riding a mellow trail or road. Recently I have added a dynamic warm up (jumping jacks, dynamic stretching) before I ride and this has really helped my focus (by lengthening my warm up a bit) and my body (by opening up my body, especially my back).  As I often state in my coaching sessions most of my crashes happen within 5 minutes of getting on my bike when I don’t warm up (because I am not focused).

 

Mountain bike your best

BetterRide camper Rick practicing his cornering skills! Great way to warm up!

Dan Millman (author of Way of The Peaceful Warrior and Body, Mind Mastery) recommends transition periods when going from one aspect/role of life to another (mother to bike rider, business person to bike rider, stressed out business person to patient, loving father, etc.) and this can really help you get rid of distractions and focus on the present. A pre-ride routine (see article below) is a detailed example of this. I have a short one that I do when I get to the trailhead. As I am changing from street clothes to riding gear I take a few breaths and think about: 1. The day I have had so far and then putting it behind me 2. How fortunate I am to be going on a peaceful mountain bike ride when there is so much turmoil going on in the world. 3. How beautiful the woods/mountain is that I am about to play in. 4. How much fun it is to ride my bike! 5. What I am going to focus on (vision, counter pressure, body position, etc.) to help me enjoy the ride even more. 6. Something Missy Giove told me, she makes peace with the mountain before riding. I believe she learned this from a native American tradition. She really looks around at the beauty of her surroundings and tells the mountain, thank you letting me play on you, you are beautiful, I am not here to harm you but enjoy your beauty and trails (probably slightly mis-quoted this conversation was about 20 years ago). It may sound a little new age but I have found it to be really calming and help clear my mind.

In conclusion, I stress to all of my students the importance of a warm up. It helps clear your mind and get you focused, helps loosen up your muscles and relax you and helps you get the most out of your ride. Remember that you want to do dynamic stretching before you ride, not static stretching (where you hold the stretch). Static stretching takes away up to 20% of the elasticity in your muscles for up to three hours, it should be done after exercise.

Creating a Pre-ride or Pre-race Routine

To make themselves feel comfortable and confident, top competitors in many different sports utilize a personalized pre-race (or pre-game) routine to help them perform at their best. Routines are not the same as rituals, a routine is a structured plan designed to help you reach your optimum performance while a ritual relies on superstition to control your performance (things like not washing your “lucky” socks or stepping on a crack). In other words a routine helps you take control of your performance while rituals assume fate (not you) will control your race.

I have added a night before the race routine to eliminate most causes of worry and allow you to get some sleep.

Your pre-race routine should make you comfortable in strange/new surroundings, build your confidence, eliminate stress, and prepare you to do your best. I have listed many common practices to get you started but you must experiment and find out what works best for you. This is another aspect of racing where keeping a journal can really help you find out what works..

Night Before Race (taking care of all these items really helps me sleep!)

1. Equipment

a. inspect and tune bike completely with checklist and put on number plate (how many racers have arrived at a race and realized that their # plate is back in the hotel?!)

b. prepare race clothes, shoes, pads, helmet, goggles, gloves. use a check list.

c. prepare bag to take to the start with you, spare goggles and gloves, walkman with charged batteries, food, drink etc. use check list

d. add your own topics

2. Mental

a. Know the course by heart, no missing sections, have a confident plan on how you will ride from top to bottom (worrying about how to handle that “big jump” will keep you up all night).

b. Image race run (at least twice) from standing in line at the start to your feelings of elation after crossing the finish line with a perfect run

c. Remember, only concern yourself with what you control (which basically is your equipment and your riding) worrying about how your competition will ride is a big waste of time because you have no control over their riding

c. add your own preparation (meditation, stretching, yoga, etc.)

Morning of Race

1. Physical

a. shower, stretching, what to eat and when to eat it, etc.

b. add your own

2. Mental

a. Imaging, stretching, meditation, etc.

b. find out what works for you

At Race Site

1. Physical

a. dressing routine (always dressing in a certain order can be almost like a meditation and make you feel at home even when miles away)

b. warm up

c. practice run (if offered)

d. find out what works for you

2. Mental

a. find out what your racing fears are and how to put them to rest (weeks before race) and put. Many people worry about their competition’s performance , remember only concern yourself with what you control

b. Image race run at least three times (good use of chair lift time)

c. Put yourself in optimum mental state for racing (again find out by experimenting while training) many people make a short list or mantra of why they will perform well, (i.e.. I have trained hard all winter for this, I know the course, I’m fast, I will ride my best etc.) also music is a big help to many racers

d. Create an abbreviation for the things that you need to remember to have a good run and tape it to your stem or bars. Mine is RAILUM which stands for Relax, Attitude, Intensity, Look Up, and Moto. Saying Railum and then thinking about each component of it really helps me focus.

e. find out what works for you

Use this as a rough outline adding what works and getting rid of what doesn’t through experimentation. A well thought out routine will make you confident at the start while your competition worries about their run and wonders why you are so confident.

What do you do for a warm up? I would love to hear your routines.