Applying the skills learned through deliberate practice on trail.

MTB Skills Camp Videos, A Peak Into The BetterRide Method

Wow, can’t believe I haven’t posted more actual mtb skills camp videos to help you understand how we get riders just like you riding better than they ever thought possible (cleanly riding sections of trail you never thought you would and/or winning World, Pan American and National Downhill, Cross Country, Dual Slalom and Four X Championships). If you have been reading our blog you know that learning skills is not as simple as acquiring knowledge, you must train your “procedural memory” as knowledge is NOT stored in the same part of your brain that helps you do physical skills (if you missed our most recent article on the subject read it here: ). With that in mind we educate you on how to do the skill, why this skill works (the physics behind the skill) and drills so the skill can become the DOMINANT skill in your procedural memory (under pressure (any time you on trail) you will revert to your dominant habit, often an old, incorrect habit).

First, your coach will explain how to do a skill. Why the skill is important, how to do the skill correctly and physics behind why doing this way works 100% of the time. Here is Gene in the middle of explaining weight placement when cornering:

We practice in a safe learning environment (off trail) where you can confidently focus 100% on the skill being taught (not take up brain bandwidth with fear/keeping yourself safe). The only way to train your “procedural memory” is with action, specifically structured drills so you can focus on the movements required to perform the skill. This called “Deliberate Practice”. Some photos of students practicing what they have been taught in a safe learning environment.

Rick Practicing is mountain bike skills

BetterRide camper Rick practicing his cornering skills!

Once you have executed the new skill quite a few times we then apply the skill on trail. This doesn’t always lead to success at first as the new habit is not your dominate habit (it may take weeks of doing the new habit perfectly while not reinforcing the old habit for the new, correct, in balance, in control technique to take over as your dominate habit, all depending how ingrained the old habit is and how much quality practice you put into doing the drill/s designed to in grain the correct skill)

Here is Rick on trail after learning and doing drills on pavement. Almost there just needs to lead with that outside elbow like he did on the pavement.

Here is Rick on trail after learning and doing drills on pavement. Almost there just needs to lead with that outside elbow like he did on the pavement.

Video example two, Gene explaining how to do a wheelie in balance, in control, economically and using zero upper body strength.

Students practicing wheelies in a safe environment.

Practicing efficient/in control wheelies using no upper body strength!

Susan practicing efficient/in control wheelies using no upper body strength!


Students practicing wheelies over obstacles on trail:

MTB Skills Camp

Applying the skills learned through deliberate practice on trail.


Mountain Bike at your best

Mountain Bike At Your Best By Taking Care of This Overlooked Factor!

Most mountain bikers know that they get stronger through cycles of physical stress and recovery. A 100 mile ride wears you down, good nutrition and good sleep after that ride helps you recover and grow stronger. What I never realized (until I read “The New Toughness Training For Sports” years ago) is that mental and emotional stresses can be just as debilitating as physical stress. This means a lot of your life away from the bike and/or other forms of exercise can wear you out too. To mountain bike at your best you need to manage and make sure you recover from all stresses.

Mental stress is just as it sounds, anything that mentally taxes you. This can be a challenging problem at work or home, financial worry, learning, etc., basically anything that makes you concentrate intensely or think hard. Guess what is super mentally stressful, mountain biking! The harder the trail is skill wise (to you) the more intensely you have to concentrate and this can be really taxing. At places with high consequences for failure (like Bootleg Canyon) I find I can ride a max of three days in a row before I am worn out and my riding starts to suffer. After three days there I need some mental recovery before I can ride at my best again. I do this by taking a day off or riding easier trails which take less focus.

Mountain Bike at Your Best

Riding trails like King Kong is stressful!

How do you recover from mental stress? Relax! Shut your brain off! The absolute best way is to meditate (which will help in many other ways both on the bike and in life) but meditating is hard wish turns many people off. If you are interested in meditating and it positive effects start doing it! There are probably many teachers in your area and tons of information on the ole inter webs. If meditating isn’t your cup of tea then simply try shutting your brain down, deep breathing exercises, taking a nap, watching a simple movie (not an intense French film with subtitles), have a beer or glass of wine or two (much more than two and you may be harming yourself in other ways), yin yoga, anything that slows you down and shuts your brain off.

In our busy, over stimulated lives (smart phones, traffic, long work hours, etc) it is easy to become overloaded mentally and all aspects of your life will suffer. The “work hard, play harder” philosophy almost guarantees mental stress. SCHEDULE time to alleviate your mental stress and you will see a big difference in your performance on trail (and life in general) riding.

character 2

Mountain Bike Your Best, Step by Step Plan

A simple, yet effective strategy to mountain bike your best that I learned from a restaurant manager at a former job. I was upset with the small volume of business we were doing, and hence my income as a bartender and my manager gave me some sage advice! Right in line with great teachers like Dan Millman and Abraham Lincoln, he said, “Gene, whether you are a janitor or president of the United States if you do your job to the best ability you will go home happy.” At the time I was young and I did the things I loved to the best my ability (I spent a small fortune on snowboard coaching and never missed a day of team practice) but often tried to just “get by” at things like that lame bartending job. Well, I took that to heart and it really changed my life! I put my best into that job everyday and it improved my life, my snowboarding and future jobs/businesses.

Mountain Bike at Your Best

Abe was wise!

How can this help you as a mountain biker? Well, it is so easy to make excuses to NOT do your best and just cruise through life seeking the easiest path. We are all prone to it, it is the new American dream, get rewarded for no effort, win the lottery, slip and fall in Wal-Mart and sue them for millions! I know you don’t consciously think that way but it is the prevailing attitude in our society and it is very hard not to be affected by it. I make the same excuses I hear my students say, “I’m too busy”, “if I put that much effort into it it won’t be fun, this is my escape, I don’t want it to become work”, “I’m just not a natural athlete“, etc. Then I get over it and start putting my heart and soul into!

Step 1: Realize fully that challenging yourself leads to happiness! Seriously, have you ever won something without effort? I’m sure were stoked but it wasn’t as powerful or long lasting as the stoke you got when you faced a big challenge and won! The easiest way is not the most enjoyable, rewarding and in the end, not the most fun way to go through life.

Step 2: Decide to be your best at mountain biking! Not my best, not your hero’s best, your best! Just saying, “I am committed to being my best everyday on my mountain bike!” probably puts a smile on your face and you want to take action, starting now!

Step 3: Commit to investing as much energy into your improvement that as you spend on your bike! Think about how much you spend on riding, bikes, clothes, gas, TIME, repairs, hospital bills, etc. Yet you have probably invested little to no time or money to honestly getting better.

Step 4: Read and study one/all of the following books and they will explain why riding everyday without structured practice will make you worse. All of these books talk about the importance of deliberate practice in improving at anything: The Talent Code, Talent is Overrated, Mastery, Outliers, Slow Practice Will Get You There Faster, Body Mind Mastery and pretty much any book on reaching your best.

Step 5: Realize that though you can ride trails better now than when you started you still aren’t as confident and skilled as you could be. Your instincts are great at hunting and gathering but terrible at mountain biking! Your instincts are thousands of years old and do terrible things like cause you to brake in a corner when you feel you are going to fast (about the worst thing you can do in a corner), your instincts cause you to look down when you bike slides or your in a rough rock garden (again, the worst thing you can do in those situations and you “know” to look ahead but your survival instincts won’t let you). Simply riding a little harder/faster each day does not make you better, it simply adapts you to your bad habits (at least for me and many of our students who took a camp after 5-30 years of “teaching” themselves), Bryson Martin, owner of DVO Suspension said this to Cedric Gracia (one of his sponsored athletes), “After over 30 years of riding this guy (pointing to me) taught me how to ride a bike.” My intent wasn’t to impress you with that comment, it was to impress upon you the importance of actually understanding the core skills of mountain biking and knowing how to get really good at those skills.

Step 6: Take one of our guaranteed, structured, skills progression camps. We are really good at helping you become much, much better and really want to help you! Pay attention, take notes and learn the core skills and drills to master those skills. It has worked for thousands of riders just like you, World Champions, National Champions, Pan American Champions, Olympic BMX Silver Medalists, riders with less experience than you and riders with more experience than you. (Coaching and coaching our coaches is what I focus on being my best at everyday, for the last 26 years!) This will be the best investment you have ever made in your riding or your money back.

Step 7: Practice! Actually practice, using structured drills with a purpose.

Step 8: Keep practicing! Amateurs practice until they get it right, pros practice until they can’t get it wrong! That is why the best athletes in the world spend 80-99% of their time practicing, not “doing” their sport! 99% of mountain bikers spend 100% of their mountain bike time doing and 0% practicing. Imagine practicing the correct, in balance, in control, efficient skills using drills for just 20 minutes three days a week! You would be riding much, much better in a very short amount of time!

Stop fooling yourself into thinking you just need to ride more to get better and start improving today by signing up for a BetterRide camp! We are here to help.

What can consistent deliberate practice do for you? Well, in my case, I’m 48 (racing age 49), not in great shape (haven’t done any leg work other than riding in over a year) but still managed a second place finish (behind Redbull Rampage legend Lance Canfield) on a gnarly track this weekend at Bootleg Canyon. As an old scared guy I finished ahead of a lot of much fitter, more fearless riders, nothing beats skills!

Do your drills, make everything we taught you second nature and you will be amazed at how confidently you ride ANY trail!

Cymantha Poison Spider climbing

You Don’t Need a Trail to Mountain Bike Better….

You Don’t Need a Trail to Mountain Bike Better….

As the trail riding season for many riders ends it doesn’t mean the end of your riding season. When the trails are covered in snow and/or mud is the best time to improve your skills!

Learning takes place best away from the sport you are learning! That’s right, if you are spending a lot of time doing a sport it is hard to improve. This is because perfect practice is what builds skill, not simply doing something for hours.  There is a general rule among coaches, teachers and physiologists that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to master a sport (or a game, an instrument, etc.).  While your goal might not be to master mountain biking the more time you spend doing deliberate practice the better you will get.

When a rider says, “I ride 20 hours a week! I am getting tons of practice!”  I have to smile as chances are not one minute of those 20 hours was deliberate practice.  Deliberate practice means working on one specific skill (or movement) with a focus on quality, not quantity. A great example of this would be, “I am going to practice riding with 100% of my weight on my pedals down these stairs,” then riding down those stairs while focusing on keeping your weight on the pedals three times, stopping and analyzing what you did right and wrong then refocusing and doing it three more times. Practicing many skills, such as saying, “I am going to practice on perfect body position, weight on my pedals, hinged at the hips, chest down, chin up, elbows up and out, knees bent, looking ahead, with a light grip on the bars”, is overwhelming and often you will do none of those skills well. This especially true if you try to do that on trail. There is an old saying, “Amateurs practice until they get it right, pros practice until they can’t get it wrong!”

You Don’t Need a Trail to Mountain Bike Better....

Practicing efficient/in control wheelies using no upper body strength!

Practice is hard to do when a beautiful singletrack is beckoning you to ride it!  In season it is hard not to just go out and ride mile after mile with a big grin on our face! The only problem with riding as much as we can is that we get really good at what we already are doing, which is often a series of bad habits.  So to improve we have to step away from the trail, learn the proper techniques and then practice these techniques one at a time with a focus on quality.  This is why you see all the basketball players, football players, ski racers and pretty much every professional athlete in a sport requiring skill doing drills more than 80% of their practice time!

There are two big things working against us on trail when our goal is to mountain bike better:

1. Even with the best intentions we forget what it is we are supposed to be working on. The trail becomes too fun and we stop practicing and just get in the moment (one of the most fun parts of riding! But it doesn’t help us work on skills!)

2. The concern for our own safety makes us revert to our survival instincts (like braking in a corner) instead of focusing on what we want to practice. This happens to pro racers on beginner trails in our camps. Something I and our coaches hear all the time from our most experienced (20 to 30 years of riding experience) and most accomplished students (World, National and Pan American Champions and an Olympic Silver Medalist) is, “Wow, I can’t believe how much I am looking down!” This is said on trails most of us would call beginner trails, hardly challenging to ride, but hard to ride perfectly.

Ever notice that football players spend a great deal of practice doing drills with no defense trying to break up the play? Watch a pro basketball team practice, the best basketball players in the world practice layups with no one defending the hoop! Heck, I can make 10 out of 10 layups with no one defending the hoop but I can’t make 1 out of 10 layups with a 300 pound, seven foot tall player trying to stop me from making that layup. So why do the best pros in the world practice in an easier, less dangerous environment than what they get paid to play in? They practice in a safe environment to ingrain the correct movements. Let’s face it, if the best basketball coach in the world taught you the correct technique for shooting a layup and then had you face Shaquille O’Neil to practice you couldn’t do a thing the coach told you. You would resort to self-defensive mode.

Applying the skills learned through deliberate practice on trail.

Applying the skills learned through deliberate practice on trail.

Use the off-season to learn the correct core skills and then practice them with a focus on quality. Your skills, confidence and enjoyment will soar.  Snowing outside?! Hit that parking garage and spend 20 minutes doing the core skills drills we teach in our camps and then spend 10 minutes imaging perfect technique.  A few weeks of this quality practice (mixed with resistance training and cardio work) will do more than years of just winging it on the trail (according to World Champ Ross Schnell who said, “I learned more today than in the last 10-11 years of just riding” (in a rushed 3.5 hour lesson, BetterRide camps are 19-22 hours over 3 days!). Ross however didn’t master those skills in our 3.5 hour lesson; he simply learned how to do them and how to practice them. The real improvement comes with deliberate practice. Check out this article on how to practice:

Stop selling yourself short and start actually practicing the sport you love. Keep your eye out for our next few blog posts as we will be focusing on specific skills and drills you can do.