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Students Get BetterRide MTB Skills Coaching Tattoos!

Two BetterRide mountain bike skills students got BR tattoos less than a week after their three day skills progression (camp)!

Jan and Eric, a couple from Santa Cruz, CA got similar but different BetterRide MTB tattoos a week after their camp with us!

Jan’s tattoo:

 

Jan's sweet Tattoo!

What Jan had to say: “This camp was real emotional for me.  I gathered so much information from the Betterride 3-day camp.  The vision tool of looking ahead to the body position of being centered over the bottom bracket to the importance of drills were stressed over and over among other helpful hints.  I went to two and one half other skill camps that were 8 hr day camps for beginners thru experts, but they just didn’t do it for ME.  All I took away from those courses were broken bones.  Those camps showed me a few drills the first half of the day and then the second half of the day was spent riding the trail.   During the Betterride camp, sometimes I was on the crest of shedding tears of fear that were brought on from my experience at prior camps, but by the end of the 3-days, I was shedding tears of joy.  I was overwhelmed with a great experience with a new way of teaching and learning.  What a better way to share this with others than with a Betterride Tattoo!
Jan

(Mind you Gene,  I do not have any negative -ness with those camps that I went to before yours.  I believe in the coaches that work with these camps.  I know they love coaching or else they wouldn’t be doing it. The thing about coaching and students is it has to “click”.  There were students in those classes who had way less experience than I, and came out better than I did in those clinics.  I did want to mention that at class but I didn’t want to talk too much.)

Eric’s Tattoo:

 

Eric's Tattoo!

I won’t bore you with more praise for BetterRide from Eric, I will let his tattoo do the talking!

BetterRide founder Gene Hamilton said he was flattered and still in a state of disbelief. “We have had a lot of students blog about their experience in our camps, mention us in mountain bike magazines and write thank you notes, but this is over the top!” exclaimed Hamilton.

BetterRide MTB Skills Camp Featured in Wired Magazine!

Wired Magazine has a series of articles on a road rider learning how to mountain bike. The series takes him through learning about different bikes, learning on his own and attending one of our mtb skills camps. The writer also calls BetterRide founder Gene Hamilton “… essentially the lovechild of Ted Nugent and Jeff Spicoli”! Find out why here:

http://www.wired.com/playbook/2012/11/dirt-dog-vol-iii?pid=1060

I Purposely Crashed My Mountain Bike Today!

I Purposely Crashed My Mountain Bike Today! (How to Set Yourself Up to Ride Your Best)  MTB Training Article by Gene Hamilton

Seriously, I made myself crash! I didn’t want to crash but if you watched the lead up to my crash I did everything possible to set myself up for disaster.

I often tell my students that most mountain bike crashes happen within five minutes of throwing your leg over your bike. I explain that often, when we don’t warm up for at least ten minutes (twenty to thirty minutes is best) we aren’t fully focused and ready to ride. Today I disobeyed my warm up rule and paid for it. I woke early (5:45 am), fixed a rear flat and headed to South Mountain. When I arrived I had just enough time to get my riding gear on and we were off.  I even said, “I don’t know how you guys do this, I like to warm up before I ride.” Colin then said maybe we should do a long run (a series of trails that have a a few climbs and flat sections providing a decent warm up) and I decided against it! Off we went down Geronimo, I felt pretty good on the first section, missed a few lines but considering the lack of warm up felt alright. After waiting for the crew to regroup I took off down the trail and had a conscious thought (should I take my normal line or try this other line), took a different line than normal and the next thing I knew I was on the ground in a lot of pain.

Conscious thoughts have no place in mountain biking, you need to just do, not make decisions! I wasn’t in mountain bike mode, I was still trying to wake up, thinking about the election results and the traffic I fought to get to the trail. This was not the focus I needed to ride scary trails at my best!

I landed about seven feet below the trail and was fortunate to land on one of the only spots with sand mixed with rocks, as the next 100 meters is all big rocks on the side of the trail. I Feel really fortunate that I wasn’t hurt worse. Ended up with a sore left shoulder, deep thigh bruise on my left thigh, cut left ankle, headache, big scratch in my fork stanchion, broken left grip and feeling rather nauseous.

The moral of this story is warm up before you mountain bike! Your body and your brain both need to be warmed up and in bike mode (not loving father mode, stressed out business woman mode, mad about bad drivers mode or still thinking about what your boss said mode!) before you end down a trail! My usual warmup consists of 5-10 minutes of dynamic stretching then a minimum of 15 minutes of riding (often doing body position and cornering drills plus a few sprints). I ALWAYS ride better when I do this! Glad re-learning this lesson for the 6th or 7th time did not involve a trip to the hospital!

Did You Set an Intention For Your Ride?

What is your Intention?

As you know, (if you have taken a BetterRide camp) we always tell our mtb students to ride with a purpose; “I am going to work on braking before the turns.” “I am going to focus on keeping my weight on the pedals.”  Well, I just realized that these purposes are sub-goals or process goals (smaller goals we use to reach big goals). I still recommend that you ride with a purpose, but recently in a yoga class I learned a more powerful tool for improving your riding!

I’m not very good at yoga (though I’m getting much better with practice) and don’t love it the way I love mountain biking, I do it mostly because I know it helps me mountain bike, snowboard and surf better. Yoga has taught me a lot of lessons though and I apply those lessons when doing sports. In yoga classes the instructor will often ask each student to set their intention for the class. The instructor wants each student to set a big goal, such as staying in the moment or finding inner peace, what they will gain/takeaway from the class. This allows the student to get more out of each class and definitely helps me. Yesterday, while surfing I found having an intention helps in sports too. I caught the best wave of my life thanks to setting an intention!

The toughest parts of surfing for me are actually catching the darn wave and then standing up in good body position. With my snowboard background I am actually a decent surfer if I manage to catch a wave and stand up. So my purpose is usually either, “catch the wave” or “pop up”. Well, yesterday the waves were perfect for learning and I caught more waves and popped up more than ever before, but my rides were short and uninspiring. The tide was going out and the reef was getting dangerously shallow so my coach said, “Gene, this will be your last wave so ride it as far as you can.” Bam! I had an intention, ride my wave as far as I can. So I paddled hard, caught the wave, popped up and had the best ride of my life!

 

My Cousin Michael Dropping in at G-Land

As I was walking back on the beach I realized why my previous waves were so short, I had exceeded my purpose/s! Since I struggle so much with catching the wave and popping up I had no plan for what to do after I popped up. My intention gave me a clear plan, “ride as far as you can”. To do this I had to use a lot of skills or specific “purposes” I have worked on since my first surf camp; looking ahead, staying relaxed, bending my knees, etc. It was my intention that allowed me to access all of these skills, as I had to use all of them to ride that wave so far. Having that intention also allowed me to forget about the two purposes I had spent the last days focusing on (catching the wave and popping up) since my intention was the longest ride possible catching the wave and popping were givens! I wasn’t worried about either, allowing me to just do them!

How does this apply to you as a mountain biker? We need to understand the difference between an intention and a purpose and sometimes have a purpose and other times focus on your intention. I didn’t see the difference between the two before. “Riding as smooth as I can” is a great example, I used to tell students that this is a great purpose yet in reality it is an intention. Riding as smooth as you can requires a lot of separate skills or purposes, relaxed grip on the bars, weight on the pedals, elbows up and out, chest down, chin up, relaxed ankles, looking ahead and working with the trail. When you set the intention of being as smooth as you can be you will do all the skills required to be smooth. If you find you aren’t riding smoothly, you can analyze why (“darn, I’ve got the death grip on my bars”) and set a purpose to help you reach your intention, (my purpose is to relax my grip so I can be smoother). Setting your intention allows you to focus on the big picture, what do I want to get out of this ride? While having a purpose focuses us on a small piece of the big picture.  So, when you are not working on a specific skill, set an intention for your ride!

Some great intentions for mountain bikers:

- I am going to ride as smooth as I can.

- I am going be in the moment.

- Today I’m going to just relax and have fun on my bike.

- I’m going to be as efficient as I can be.

- I’m going to ride as fast as I can. *This one is tricky! Often this focus can make us tense and we start trying too hard. If this is your focus, time the ride and compare the time to being smooth on the same course, you might find being smooth is faster!

- I’m going to let go of all the tension in my body.

- I’m going to let go of all the tension in my mind.

- I’m going to take my time to stop and appreciate this beautiful day/trail/mountain/view etc.

Set your own intentions and let us know about the ones that really had a positive impact on your riding. This really, really helps you focus and improve your mental game on the bike!