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How to keep motivated this winter for summer mountain biking!

How to keep motivated this winter! (this is part two of a series on staying motivated and goal setting, if you missed part one you can find it here http://betterride.net/?p=873 )

Goal Setting

“Any time some one asks me, “teach me something new”, I know they are not into mastery. If you want to master anything you have to do it over and over again”. Anthony Robbins

  1. With goals we create the future in advance.

  2. ’53 Class of Yale, 3% had specific, written goals. 20 years later in 1973 when interviewed those 3% were happier, enjoyed their life more (which I know are subjective measuring) what isn’t subjective though is that those 3% were wealthier than the other 97% of their class combined!

  3. A goal not written down is just a dream!

Whether you are a weekend mountain bike rider who just rides to get out in nature for some fresh air or a determined mountain bike racer it is tough to stay motivated to stay in shape during the off-season.

Like most mountain bikers I am not always super motivated to workout or train on cold winter days. The riding and/or mountain bike racing season seems so far away it is tough to stay motivated in the winter. The winter is a great time to assess your riding season and your goals and set new goals. Follow my season wrap up and goal setting worksheet, then do something I learned from Dan Milliman in his book Body Mind Mastery, he says, “Set your goals then put them aside and focus on being the best you can be on any given day”.   He goes on to explain that by focusing on goals that are often 6 month to 5 years away it takes us out of the moment and we don’t enjoy our day to day life.  He tells us that victory is fleeting and if we don’t enjoy the journey on the way to achieving our goals what is the point.

An example of this in my own life is doing intervals (85-100% efforts for intervals 30 seconds to 6 minutes). I would often say to myself, “Gosh, I hate intervals, feeling like you are going to puke for 5 minutes, resting and repeating is miserable, but if I want to win (the World Masters/Angel Fire or what ever my goal was that season) I have to do them”. As you can imagine I didn’t do them as much as I should have and every time I did do them I did not enjoy them. When I won a bronze medal at the UCI Mountain Bike World Masters Championships in 1999 it was the happiest moment of my life, until the next morning. I woke up, was proud of my medal, then thought about the last 9 months and my current situation. I was in Montreal in a beat up ’84 VW van with 197,000 miles on it, an exhaust leak, and three smelly mountain bikers, not sure if it would get us home, I was broke (actually a couple grand in debt to my credit cards), had no job, no place to live, all my “stuff” was in storage and had no girlfriend to come home to (and I had not had a girl friend or a date for a long time). For the 9 months leading up to the World Masters I was really focused on my goal. In those months I did my intervals, I hit the gym hard, I ate really well, went to bed early and was probably not the most fun person to be around. Going to bed early meant no dating, I was sacrificing my social life. Intervals are tiring and I looked at them as being painful, not fun, I was punishing myself. To train so hard and race the national schedule I quit my job in April (not enough time to train, recover, travel to races and work). As I assessed these months and my current situation the thrill of victory quickly faded.

Not only is the thrill of victory short lived, what happens when you come up short or don’t even get the chance to go for your goal (you get injured, lose funding, change careers or set a different goal, etc.)? Now you did all that sacrificing for nothing! All those intervals and I am not even racing, what a waste. Well, if you did the best you could each day and enjoyed the journey their was no sacrifice.

A year later I went back to the World Masters set on winning and finished second in the qualifying round! Unfortunately in the final race run my chain came out of my chain retention device in the first turn and my race was over (I stopped, put the chain back on pedaled furious into the next section and the chain came off again, I coasted in to 8th or 9th place). This was one of the most disappointing moments of my life. I had the Silver Medal in the bag and with a solid run I could have easily won the Gold. When I woke up the next day I was still a little disappointed but I took stock of my life and realized it was no big deal, just a bike race. I was in the best shape of my life (which at 34 felt great!), I had a great girlfriend, a good job and a cool apartment to return to. What a difference from the year before!

Now I set my goals then focus on being the best I can be at each given task on the way there. When that task is intervals I am not doing them to win a race, I am doing them because I enjoy the challenge of pushing my body that hard and the good, exhausted, but satisfied feeling I get afterward. Knowing that I am 44, in great shape and getting stronger with every workout is a great feeling.

Dan Millman goes on to explain that if we do our best everyday we will not only enjoy our lives more we will likely exceed our goals. So look out next year, I am training hard and enjoying my life more than ever! Who thought I could still beat half the pro field at 45?!

Think of training as something that will make you a better, happier, more successful person, not as a sacrifice. The real sacrifice is spending all that time and money traveling to fun riding spots like Fruita or Moab and wishing that you had more energy and could ride more. There is nothing worse than finishing poorly in a race and thinking, “If I had just…. practiced a little more… trained a little harder…. etc. Saying “what if” is a sad way to go through life (and I have done it too many times in my life). “He just beat me because he practices/gets to ride more than I do”. Yep, that probably is why he beat me. That and he wanted it more than me which is why he practiced more than me.

At 44 and even when I was younger I have never raced to win. I race to do my best and there is no bigger disappointment than letting yourself down. So whether you are training for a long mountain bike ride in Moab next spring or the biggest race or your life, train hard and have fun!

Third Place 1999 World Masters Championships

Now is the Time to Start Working Towards Your Best Season Yet in 2011!

Now that the 2010 season is over (for most of us) and you have had a few weeks off from serious training, riding or competition it is time to prepare for next season. If you are serious about becoming the best rider or racer you can be now is the time to act. All the knowledge in the world is worthless without action. Below is an abbreviated version of the questionnaire I use with my full-time athletes to evaluate their season and design their training program for the next racing season.  Use this to evaluate your performance in 2010 and help your plan an even better 2011!

Do you keep a training and racing diary? A diary is a big help in the following exercise and though out the season for finding factors that lead to changes in performance. If you haven’t kept a training diary in the past, start now. A training diary helps you learn what parts of your training are working and what parts are not can explain “peak” performances and poor performances and is a great confidence booster by tracking all the hours of training you have put in.

Step One: Assess your racing season and your riding ability. Honestly and objectively answer the following questions about your 2010 season.

Did your skills improve over the course of the season?

What are your strongest skills? (cornering, jumping, steeps, etc.)

What skills need the most improvement?

How did the season go physically?

Did you start strong and get stronger as the season went on?

Did you fade in late July and August? Why?

Did you have the optimum combination of sprinting speed and endurance?

Did you pick 3 to 5 big races to peak for? Were you able to peak for those races?

How was your mental game?

Were you confident and riding to your potential or did you find yourself racing below the level that you know you are capable of?

Why?

What factors helped your confidence this season?

What factors hurt your confidence this season?

Did you a have comprehensive (mental, physical and skill) training program? What part of your program worked? What parts didn’t work?

Did your racing improve as the season went on?

Did you create and write down concrete goals?

Did you reach your racing goals?

Step Two: Use the answers to these questions as an evaluation of your strengths and weaknesses setting the foundation your 2011 season training program.

Set career, three years from now and this season’s racing goals (top three over all in my state series, etc.), physical training goals (decrease my 50 yard sprint time by 15%, increase my maximum squat by 20%, etc.), skills goals (improve balance, improve cornering, etc.) and mental training goals (improve visualization, learn relaxation techniques, etc.) for your 2011 season.

Racing Goals

1. Career goal

2. Three year goal

3. This season’s goal

Physical training Goals, to allow me to reach my racing goals

1.

2.

3.

Skills Training Goals, to allow me to reach my racing goals

1.

2.

3.

Mental training Goals, to allow me to reach my racing goals

1.

2.

3.

Work with your coach or consult a book such as The Mountain Biker’s Training Bible, by Joe Friel and/or James Wilson’s MTB strength training programs to create a training plan to reach all of the above goals. Why a coach? A coach can provide you with a structured training program designed to reach your goals while working around your schedule, an objective eye on your skills and physical training, motivate you and share his/her wisdom speeding up your improvement.

Step Three: Act on your training program! Ride! Workout! Visualize! Constantly update your goals and training program based on improvement or lack of improvement.

Remember, unwritten goals are just dreams, goals you write down you will commit to and strive to reach. Good luck next season and feel free to call or e-mail with questions, suggestions or to start a personal coaching program.

10 Tips for Mountain Biking in Sand.

10 Tips for Mountain Biking in Sand.

Its fall and time to start heading south to ride which means desert riding season is upon us!  Riding in deep sand can be frustrating experience. If you follow these tips it will be much more enjoyable.

1. When trying to apply power in a straight line, sit back on your saddle a little and pedal forward like on a recumbent (so the “bottom” of your pedal stroke is about 4 o’clock instead of 6). Missy Giove taught me this 15 years ago in Moab and it really works.
2. Use an easy gear (pushing a hard gear will dig you down into the sand) and be realistic about your speed. You will not be able to accelerate quickly or even maintain much speed in deep sand.
3.  When going from hard pack to sand realize that this is going to suddenly slow you down. Although I always stress riding with your weight centered on your bike, this is one of those instances where you want to get your weight back a little as you transition from hard pack to sand. If you hit sand centered you will immediately be forward as your bike will slow down in the sand but your body will keep going forward.
4. When coasting, stand and shift your weight back a little so the front tire doesn’t sink in.
5. Don’t worry if you get a little off line, as long as you are vaguely going where you want to go
you are fine.
6. Do not steer! Changing directions in sand is done gradually by leaning/using counter pressure, trying to quickly change direction will make your front tire “crab” and dig into the sand.
7. Stay centered on your bike in corners, the urge to “creep back” will take weight off the front wheel (good in a straight line in sand bad in a corner) causing it to slide out.
8. Look ahead, where you want to go (I know that you already know this but you aren’t doing it), I stress this a lot because it is huge! Looking ahead is not 3 feet in front of you (the last time you stopped in sand where were you looking, that’s right, you were looking right where you stopped, it is so easy to say, “yeah, I know to look ahead” but it is very hard to actually look ahead (2-10 seconds ahead on the trail)). We spend 45 minutes explaining vision, how to use it correctly while riding and doing vision drills in our BetterRide camps and clinics and then expect you to spend the next 3-8 years doing the drills we teach to master this. Knowing to do something is way different than actually doing it.

9. Relax! Relax your grip, breath, smile and don’t fight the sand (as it will win).

10. Wide tires really help you float on top of the sand. If you are headed to Moab or other areas with a lot of sand a big 2.3-2.5 inch tire with big tread will help greatly in the sand.