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A Frustrating Thing That Often Holds Us Back on the MTB Trail! (video)

Is this frustrating thing (that we all experience) holding you back on the mtb trail?

Are you letting failure hold you back?! Or worse yet, fear of failure? Dan Millman (World Champion Gymnast, Coach and Author) said, “Failure is natural and necessary part of the learning process.” He is not recommending failing for the sake of failing but going for it and when you do fail, learning from it.

Some fear of failure can be good, if more 12-35 year old males with an inflated belief in their skills feared failure a little more there would be a lot less trips to the emergency room! If the fear of failure involves a 40 foot double jump you might want to listen to it. In this case you can use the fear to ask, “why am I afraid to do that” and you might have a great answer, “because I have no idea how to do that in balance and in control”! If the fear of failure is keeping you from doing something less dangerous, such as cornering a little faster when you know proper cornering technique and you have knee pads on, the fear of failure can really hold you back. In this case the answer to “but what if I fail?” is usually, “your pride will be hurt for a moment”.

So let fear of failure protect you when it can, but don’t let it defeat you when there are little or no consequences for failure.

As I was writing this I found this video on you tube, check it out:

A common “failure” in mountain biking is sliding out in a corner. If this happens to you out on the trail, instead of kicking your bike and cursing it, figure out why you slid out and design a plan so that it doesn’t happen again. This exact failure is why I started BetterRide. It went something like this, “Wow, that stinks, my front wheel just slid out and I skinned my knee! It is a loose, gravel corner, maybe I was going to fast. No, Dusty made it through going faster than me, speed wasn’t the issue. ‘Hey Dusty, what tires are you using, I think my tires made me slide out.’ Dusty replied, ‘Dart/smoke combo, same as you.’ ‘Well how did you go so fast through that corner?’, I asked. His reply was something to the effect of, ‘let go of your brakes and hang on!’ Which made me realize, I really don’t know proper cornering technique, I wonder who can coach me?” I won’t bore you with my struggle to find a coach but that is a great example of failure leading to success in two aspects of my life. I eventually learned to corner correctly and founded a company helping others to corner and ride correctly!

Back to your riding and how to let failure inspire you instead of hold you back. Next time you fail on the trail, before just riding off, or retrying whatever it was that you failed at, stop and analyze what happened. Was it lack of proper technique, loss of focus, tension, panic or fear? Once you figure out why you failed you can design a plan to succeed!

My plan to succeed at cornering was to find a coach to teach me how to corner correctly and then use drills to master cornering technique (I realize that isn’t most people’s thought process, I was a former professional snowboard racer and a snowboard team coach at the time). In my case it was because I was doing nearly everything wrong in corners; my vision was off, my balance was off and I thought to tighten up a turn I needed to steer tighter! Looking back on it the main reason my front wheel slid out was my body position. I was going relatively fast into the corner so I was a little tense and scared (not horrified, just a little worried that I wasn’t going to make it) so instinctively (see this article on instincts: http://betterride.net/?p=1837) I shifted my weight back away from danger which unweighted my front wheel so it slid out. This is something I still work on in fast descending corners, I have to fight the urge to creep back on my bike a bit. I am sure the fact that I was looking at the apex of the corner (not through the corner like I should have been), was leaning with my bike and sticking my knee out didn’t help either! In this case simply being centered over the bottom bracket instead of having my weight back over the rear wheel would have been enough to give the front wheel traction and make the corner.

In short, don’t be afraid of failure, make the most of your failures, use them to learn and improve. As Michael Jordan said, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take”. When you do fail, learn from it and use the failure as inspiration to learn and improve!

Mountain Bike How To Video, Getting Over Big Rocks or Logs

BetterRide Certified coach Chris Skolnick demonstrating how easy it is to get over a big rock when have master two simple skills, the coaster wheelie (manual) and the weight shift. This is great test, if you can’t do this you aren’t very good at these two Core Skills of mountain bike riding, if you can do this smoothly and easily you have these two skills pretty wired.

BetterRide Mountain Bike Coach Jackie Harmony on Vital MTB

BetterRide coached athlete and BetterRide coach Jackie Harmony featured on Vital MTB website wallpaper page.

Jackie Charging it in Sol Vista

http://www.vitalmtb.com/features/Vital-MTB-Desktop-Wallpapers,169

Check out that vision! Jackie is looking way past the exit of the corner and achieving her goal of carrying as much exit speed as possible! If you get a chance check out that fist shoot of Rennie! Rennie was the best at cornering, vision, body position (look how low he is!) and outside elbow are spot on.

Stop Riding Your Bike So Much! (Mountain, Road, BMX, Dirt Jump)

Don’t pull a Gene! Balance is the key to a happy life, but it is a constant battle for most of us. We become nearly obsessed with one or two things (a hobby and/or our career) and neglect important areas of our lives. I see this a lot with mountain bikers, especially those who race. Training so hard all they do is work, train and sleep compromising all other aspects of their lives so they can win that Cat 3 race on Sunday.

I am the poster child for someone who gets so carried away with a hobby that it consumes them and compromises their life. From 1986 until 1992 my life revolved around snowboarding, the next 10-15 years mountain biking.

My first love/obsession was snowboarding and it was my life for five years. To try and reach the top I left family, friends and a wonderful girlfriend on the East Coast to move to Colorado and train with the best coaches. Which ended up back firing on me as leaving these people behind put more pressure on me to succeed and left my “support group” back home in Virginia. I no longer had my mother telling me how wonderful I was everyday. I didn’t have friends to hang out with and talk about things other than snowboarding (at one house a group of us lived in back east we had one rule, no talking about snowboarding in the house!), didn’t have friends to help and didn’t have friends to help me. Trust me, you gain a lot of confidence by spending time with your family and friends.

Then I discovered mountain bike racing, my second obsession which has lasted 20 years! Since the day I decided that I was going to become a pro racer I have practically dedicated my life to this sport!  I remember thinking how “giving” I was to give my “girlfriend” two whole nights with me in a week! In quotes because she later said, “I wasn’t your girlfriend, I was just the girl you hooked up with once or twice a week when you were too tired to train or work.” ouch! To feed my habit I didn’t work from early April until October so I could travel to all the races (by living in my van all summer) and worked two jobs in the winter to pay off my credit card from the summer. I honestly thought I was generous when I devoted two whole nights to her in a week! The last 7 years have been all about BetterRide with my family, friends and social life taking a backseat again.

The moral to this story is to keep things in perspective and remember, mountain biking is just your hobby! If you miss a day of training to help a friend or do poorly in race/group ride because you stayed up a little too late catching a band or going to a family function with your love, so what? It is just a bike ride/race, you aren’t saving lives.

If you notice, I never quite made it to the top in snowboarding or mountain biking. One of the biggest reasons was my lack of balance. If you look at the best in the world they have balance! Steve Peat has a lot of fun, still lives near where he grew up, hangs out with old friends and has a wife and kids, the same can be said for Eric Carter. Lars Tribus has a great career away from cycling, has a family and still manages to be a very competitive professional racer (2011 World Masters Champion). As do some of the best moms and dads in the world. Many of our students are quite successful in their careers yet manage their time so they can spend time with their family, ride, travel and enjoy many hobbies.

As for me, 2012 will be all about balance! I have already re-started my yoga practice and I am making time for a social life and my family. I am riding less but enjoying it more!

I hope you already have balance in your life or will  strive for balance starting today.

Create a happy, balanced life,

Gene