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Mountain Bike Coach Reviews Keep Pouring In

Two emails from one of our latest mountain bike camp taught by our newest BetterRide certified mountain bike coach, Andy Shabo.

“Tale of the broken gear and my better ride clinic
First thank you to Coach Andy Shabo. Great job teaching and helping each of us in the group understand what we were working on. We had a great time learning and riding. The skills training and the sessions on the trail were fantastic to tie the drills to the trails.
At the end of day two, I wanted to go ride a trail that I had not ridden to my satisfaction. I missed climbs, wasn’t smooth and didn’t accomplish what I wanted to on my first attempt (Before the clinic). Using my vision, I road the first / warm-up trail with confidence and smoother than I had ever ridden. Now I was ready for the redeem myself ride.
I entered the trail that I was going to redeem myself on, went a ways into  the trail and bent my climbing gear. It was unusable as was the next hardest gear. I walked the bike to the bottom the hill, got the chain up to a granny gear and climbed the hill with “stuff” in it. An accomplishment for me. While I could have probably finished the trail in the granny gear, I decided to go to the first usable gear in the middle of the cassette. This was not a climbing gear for me and certainly not with technical elements.
Riding the trail with this new challenge, forced me to rely on my new skills. I simply had to use vision to ride the trail and stop micro managing elements that really didn’t matter. At the base of the next short climb, I became determined to ride the rest of the trail in this not a climbing gear. Using the skills from the morning, I was able to carry speed into corners and up the short burst climbs like never before. I was getting over the obstacles in the trail, even while climbing. The end of the trail came and I was able to reflect on how much I had really learned and was able to apply at the end of day 2. I completed the trail riding smoother, making all of the obstacle and climbs that I missed before the class,  without the gear(s) that I thought I needed.
The rest of the clinic was excellent. I am looking forward to practicing these skills to make my trail riding more fun. While it really stunk to bend a gear, the experience really made me realize how valuable the skills and teaching really is. Andy was fantastic.
The attached picture is the gear bent in the cassette
Thank you
Rick Borden
Manchester clinic 9/6/2013 to 9/8/2013″
"I just wanted to drop a line about this past weekends class in New Hampshire.  It has been a few
days since the class has ended and I have been able to get out and ride and do the drills.  I have
noticed a huge improvement in my riding ability and my longevity on the bike.

Give huge kudos to Andy Shabo for his patience and constant reminders about sexy elbows and vision.

I wish I had taken this class 10 years ago.
Andrew J.

I would like to thank Andy too as without his coaching and enthusiasm we would not be able to help as many determined riders improve! Thanks Andy!

Students Get BetterRide MTB Skills Coaching Tattoos!

Two BetterRide mountain bike skills students got BR tattoos less than a week after their three day skills progression (camp)!

Jan and Eric, a couple from Santa Cruz, CA got similar but different BetterRide MTB tattoos a week after their camp with us!

Jan’s tattoo:

 

Jan's sweet Tattoo!

What Jan had to say: “This camp was real emotional for me.  I gathered so much information from the Betterride 3-day camp.  The vision tool of looking ahead to the body position of being centered over the bottom bracket to the importance of drills were stressed over and over among other helpful hints.  I went to two and one half other skill camps that were 8 hr day camps for beginners thru experts, but they just didn’t do it for ME.  All I took away from those courses were broken bones.  Those camps showed me a few drills the first half of the day and then the second half of the day was spent riding the trail.   During the Betterride camp, sometimes I was on the crest of shedding tears of fear that were brought on from my experience at prior camps, but by the end of the 3-days, I was shedding tears of joy.  I was overwhelmed with a great experience with a new way of teaching and learning.  What a better way to share this with others than with a Betterride Tattoo!
Jan

(Mind you Gene,  I do not have any negative -ness with those camps that I went to before yours.  I believe in the coaches that work with these camps.  I know they love coaching or else they wouldn’t be doing it. The thing about coaching and students is it has to “click”.  There were students in those classes who had way less experience than I, and came out better than I did in those clinics.  I did want to mention that at class but I didn’t want to talk too much.)

Eric’s Tattoo:

 

Eric's Tattoo!

I won’t bore you with more praise for BetterRide from Eric, I will let his tattoo do the talking!

BetterRide founder Gene Hamilton said he was flattered and still in a state of disbelief. “We have had a lot of students blog about their experience in our camps, mention us in mountain bike magazines and write thank you notes, but this is over the top!” exclaimed Hamilton.

Accept Where You Are!

Acceptance; love yourself, you are perfect as you are right now. As an athlete I am always working to improve my body; become stronger, faster, more flexible! As a mountain bike coach and human being I have learned that too much focus on who/what we will be can hold us back.

So often we are too focused on our future self, we lose the present moment and can get angry, frustrated or depressed. You are amazing right now! Think about how you can move your body, ride a bike and function in general! Be grateful for this, not everyone has it as easy as you do! You may wish you were more flexible, stronger and more skilled and I hope you are working on all of those. Don’t spend too much time wishing; spend more time in the present. While working on your goals relax, let that stretch happen, let that weight rise, breath through that down dog and stop trying so hard. Accept where your body is, being proud that it works as well as it does and politely ask it to move, stretch and grow.

For instance when stretching focus on stretching the desired area to the point of discomfort, not on a currently unrealistic goal such as touching your toes. Focusing on goals causes stress and can actually make you less flexible and less coordinated. The best advice on this topic I have ever heard was from Dan Millman in his book Mind Body Mastery. He instructed me to set my goals, write them down and then set them aside and simply focus on being the best I could be each day. If the best forward fold you can do today leaves your hands a foot above the ground don’t get frustrated and don’t give up. Focus on practicing the best you can (using perfect technique) instead of focusing on the outcome. As Mr. Millman stated, if you focus on being the best you can be you will likely exceed your goals and if your goals change along the way you will have enjoyed the journey.

You are perfect, and are right where you should be, right now!

 

Mountain Bike Trail Building Passion!

By BetterRide Head Coach Andy Winohradsky

So its not quite too late for New Year’s Resolutions … and here’s one for anybody that rides a bike on dirt: get out there and get your hands dirty with a few days of trail maintenance this season.

Little story: I just got back from Miami, Florida and was blown away by the quality of the riding and the vibrant MTB scene in the area.  What?  Great mountain-bike riding in South Florida?  If you find yourself with a response similar to this, you’re not alone.  I tell my riding buddies here in Colorado the same bit and they think I’m joking, and previous to my recent journey to F-L-A, I would have thought the same.

So how do you get great riding out of a place that is a flat, sandy, swampy, bug-infested jungle?  Simple (or not), you build it!  There is one reason that the trail systems that I rode were in existence and a blast to ride: a massive amount of trail work.

Anyone that has a bit of trail building experience understands that you can’t blindly hack a trail out of the side of a hill or through a forest and expect to end up with a quality result.  Proper trail building takes knowledge and experience in addition to hard work.  A good trail has to flow well, use the natural features of the area, have some good variety, among a lot of other things that can be argued about or discussed at some other time.  But to do it right takes some skill, some vision – and in the case of South Florida – a lot of creativity … and tons of hard work.

While some trail systems benefit from beautiful vistas, lush forests, and/or diverse eco-systems, the Miami area trails had none of these.  They were drained swamps, and at least one of them was an unofficial garbage dump at some point.  They appeared to be built on discarded land, and the builders had only a few acres to work with.  Trail builders created artificial and additional elevation (in addition to the natural twenty feet – tops) with wood, rocks, dirt, old carpet … sometimes 50′s era washing machines (decoratively spray painted).  Bridges were built and snaked precariously over the numerous still swampy areas (there was even a large decaying old boat grounded in what must have previously been a canal – won’t get that in Colorado) .  The trails were undoubtedly “tree-wrappers”, which can be scoffed at by us snooty western folk, but this actually added to the atmosphere and character.  Many of the tight turns were perfectly bermed, and small – but fun – jumps and rollers were dispersed through-out in order to help keep speed and momentum.  Nothing was unsafe for a beginner, yet even a washed-up, pro-downhiller like me could have a blast (Think high-speed-six-mile-singletrack-pump-track in a tropical forest).  There were some beautiful areas that wound through the everglades, and some sections of trail went right up to the ocean, so it wasn’t like you were riding through a Mad Max themed, day-glow carnival the entire time.

My point is this: from the above rant, did it sound like I had a good time?  Those people made some awesome trails out of nothing.  I don’t plan on moving to South Florida anytime in the future but if I do, I’ll still be an avid MTB’er and I won’t be hurtin’ for a wide selection of fun trails – all because a few people were willing to dream the dream and then put it into action.

And if you ride, you too should be part of that action.  Help the cause.  There are a lot of great trails already out there, but (not enough) maintenance is always an issue.   Access to MTB’ers on many trails is threatened because of this.  There are many proposed trails (some probably near you) that need as much help as they can get.  Also, trail building doesn’t only happen out there, in the dirt: good trails need well spoken people on the paper work side of things, at the board meetings of the Recreation Department, etc.

So, skip a ride or two this season and help build some trails.  Trust me, the cold beer will taste just as good at the end of the day … maybe even better!