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Our Mountain Bike Camp Students Love Us on Facebook!

Lots of thank you posts on our facebook page!  www.facebook.com/BetterRide

Dana Hantel This turned out to be one of the best weekends of my life. Jackie and Dante are amazing coaches and, as Ned said, great people too. The other campers were also super nice and supportive. We all learned so much in just three days, and I know we’ll see dramatic improvements in our riding as we continue to practice our new skills. Thank you!

Michael Takahashi Gene, I keep telling everyone I learned more in your 3 day camp than I’ve learned in 20yrs of riding a mountain bike! Much better investment for your riding – instead of buying that new fork, wheelset etc. that we all think we need to be faster!

Thank you thank you thank you for the incredible coaching of jackie harmony and dante this weekend at steamboat!!!!!!!!!!! today on my home trail I focused on getting over this rock that was a challenge before. got on it and. stuck. nothing. I tried again. got on the rock then boomp. nothing. then I could hear jackie’s voice saying “look ahead!” and the third time, I got on it and rode right on across onto the rest of the trail! HOORAY!!!!!!!! (also met some amazing women and can’t wait to ride with them again. thanks again. THIS IS AN AMAZING CAMP!!!!!!!!

Stop being a Mountain Bike Bigot!

In 12 years of coaching mtb skills I still cannot get over how closed minded mountain bikers can be! “Oh, he is a single speeder, they always…”, “damn downhiller’s with 8″ of travel, of course they can ride that section, no skill, the bike does all the work, bet he can’t climb to save his life”, “look at that idiot on that fully rigid bike doesn’t he know…”, etc. Well, we are doing the exact same sport! Riding bicycles off road and guess what? The Core, Fundamental Skills are All The Same no matter what kind of mtb you are riding!

Cornering on a downhill bike is fundamentally the same as cornering on a full rigid bike. There are some advanced skills you can add with 8″ of  suspension travel and cornering on a fully rigid bike is harder (because no matter how smooth you are you will have less traction on a rigid bike) but the fundamental, most important skills are the same.

This is true with jumping, climbing technical sections, descending technical sections, riding a bike!

Why is this important to you? Because if you want to improve you can learn a lot from riders that are different from you. The skill it takes for Greg Minnaar and Mitch Ropelato to corner so well is the exact same skill all mountain bikers need, regardless of the bike they are on or the label they give themselves. Think about it, if the best downhill racers in the world need those skills to corner a bike that has way better traction* than most non-downhill bikes, those skills must be extra important on a “xc” bike. So an “xc” rider can learn from the watching a rider like Steve Peat corner even though Steve is on a different mountain bike.

*Downhill bikes have longer travel/better working suspension (which keeps the tires on the ground better than non-dh bikes), downhill bikes have wider tires with likely less air pressure (producing a bigger contact patch), softer rubber compound tires (which grip way better than harder rubber but roll slower, wear out quicker and cost more) and more tread patterns designed for hooking up on the surface they are riding (providing more traction than a general purpose tread pattern).

So open your mind and stop labeling people/riders/things. You can learn from our examples/videos/coaching even if the example we us is on a much different bike that yours.  We are fortunate enough to coach many of the best races in the world in all disciplines of mtb racing and we teach them all the same core skills (although in our downhill camps we don’t teach climbing skills as climbing on a 40lb bike isn’t much fun!). Yes, we taught singlespeed World Champions Ross Schnell and Sue Haywood the exact same cornering skills in the camps they took from us as we taught World Cup downhill racers Mitch Ropelato and Jackie Harmony in their downhill camps.

Why I am the Most Fortunate Man Alive!

Although we are most famous for having the best mountain bikers in the world  (like World Champions Ross Schnell and Sue Haywood) taking our camps most of our students are just passionate riders looking to improve. While it feels really good and strokes my ego when MTB racers like Ross tell me how much they leaned in our camps it is emails like the following too that really make my day. Last week, Andy (BetterRide Head Coach) said his job is the best job in the world and providing him with it (and having him do such a good job) makes me feel fortunate indeed!

Andy with students, Fruita, CO

 

Here are two emails that students have send Andy recently:

Andy — I wanted to write to say thank you SO much for your awesome instruction at the Madison Better Ride camp.  I was one of the three Chicago roadies at that camp and the three of us had gotten together a few times since the camp ended to work on skills.  Believe it or not, Brian (Francine’s husband) just bought cones to practice with.  We’ll be using them soon.

Before Better Ride, I would go to the Kettle Moraine (one of WI’s state parks in the southern part of the state) with my group and I’d be promptly dropped on one of the more technical loops that we’d ride.  We went again yesterday.  It was my first time doing extended riding with the group since the camp and it was fantastic!
I didn’t get dropped because my skills this time (it should be noted that I did get dropped on the climbs, but that’s what happens when you put a track rider uphill). I felt like I was flying through the course.  Of course, at times, I was a little wobbly trying to stay low, and work on the skills you taught us.  I’m still very new to mountain biking but I had significantly improved since the last time I was there and it was pretty obvious.   I’m still working on cornering, among many other skills, but I was so happy to have made the improvement that I did.  Thank you so, so much for your help.

Angie

Andy Coaching a BetterRide Student, Fruita, CO

Hey Andy,

Thanks again for a great class in Cincinnati, worth every dime. You are great at what you do, and a perfect teacher…..keep it up!

Got my 31in bars and 50mm stem along with the seat post…..AWESOME!

It’s like a new bike, I love it. Really amazing the difference that all makes…….who’d a thunk it. lol

Thanks again for everything and I will be in the 2nd class for sure.

Have a great summer….

Dan

This Email from a BetterRide MTB Skills Student may Make You Mad!

A warning to you, if you have a big ego you might not want to read this. I heard from many people the Whiskey Off-road had super technical sections and half the field or more walked a lot of the course. Well Elaine and many of my students rode right by the walkers. They weren’t more daring, just simply in balance and in control, way to go Elaine!
Elaine’s email:
Hi Gene,

My husband, Zac, and I took your DH camp at Bootleg back in March and wanted to give you an update. I had been working on the skills on my local XC trails (Fantasy Island and Starr Pass). I figured otherwise if I only practiced on DH runs I’d hardly get any practice in.

Earlier this year I did the Whiskey off-road in Prescott. I was doing the 25 miler for fun, as I had never done it before. Took my camera along to take pics during the ride and everything. At the pre-race meeting they said we would have 2 really long downhills to ride in amongst all the climbing. So I was really looking forward to that! The trail was super crowded and I stood in line on the climbs for about 15 min before the stream of people got going again. Good thing I was only doing the event for fun and wasn’t racing and worried about a time.
I got to the first downhill and it was awesome! This was the first time I had to practice the new body position I learned in camp. No more stretching out over the rear tire. I had the elbows out, back flat, chest down and even though it felt a little strange because I was still getting used to it, I told myself to trust it and stay in that position. The trail was very loose with scree, but my rear tire was planted. Everyone in front of me was steering around the water bars and I was going straight over, passing when I could. I was watching the XC riders in front of me and it was scary. They were twitchy and all over the place and I just stayed in my body position, at some points at almost a track stand while I waited for them to get over an obstacle.

At one point the trail opened up onto a ridge down the mountain. Everyone in front of me was walking but I stuck to my guns and started down the hill. I called out to those down below “rider up” and they moved off the line as I rode down. Everyone was standing with their bikes as they hiked down and I rode by, and it felt like I was in my own personal World Cup and they were spectators on the side of the trail. It was awesome! I totally cleaned the DH and felt like a rockstar as the other riders watched.

Anyways, that has been my highlight moment so far. We have a couple of trips planned this year up to Sunrise and a week at AngelFire, so I’ll be practicing more skills.

Hope all is well with you!

Take care,

Elaine

If you want to ride like Elaine or simply improve your mountain bike riding, invest in yourself instead of your bike and sign up for a camp today.