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Mountain biking

Mountain Biking, Make Skill Improvements Stick! Forever! Starting Now!

When mountain biking we often overlook crucial mental skills that help us use our physical skills better and more confidently. The mistake we will work on today I have nicknamed, “Riding with Fully Rigid Eyes”.

I came up with the name, “Fully Rigid Eyes” when I realized I was looking at the trail with the same “eyes” as I did on my first mtb ride in 1989! It was 1998, nine years later and my skill and my equipment was head and shoulders better than it was in 1989 but I was looking at the trail like I did on that first ride (on a fully rigid mountain bike)!

Let me explain the situation and how you can use this to help make your mountain biking skill increases “stick” and become much more confident. From 1994-1998 (dates might be off my a year) the first downhill race of the year for me was down the Porcupine Rim Climb (Starting at the Top of “Lazy Man’s and finishing by the stock tanks on Sand Flats road). I always walk the trails I race and memorize them (where I do EVERYTHING, where I brake, where I let off the brakes, where it get’s rocky, the lines I take, where I shift, where I sprint, etc.) and to help remember the track I make up names for each section (the fast section, the steep section, the wooded section, etc). At this race there was a rock garden which I called the “gnarly section” and on my hardtail with 1.5″ of fork travel up front and a 120 mm stem it was kind of gnarly.  However, by 1998 I had a 6″ travel full suspension bike, a 60 mm stem and my skills were much better than in 1994 (and way better than in 1989!).

On to the race! There I was, blasting through the “Gnarly Section” on my sweet Yeti/Lawwill Straight 6 with a big grin on my face. As I crossed the finish line after my first run it occurred to me, it isn’t gnarly anymore! At this race I always got a minimum of ten practice runs and the promoter gave us two race runs so by my race run in 1998 I had 50 practice runs and 10 race runs on that track! In that time I never crashed in that “gnarly section”. If you can make something 60 times out of 60 attempts, it must not be too gnarly! But, I was still calling it the gnarly section! What do you think I was thinking as I railed the corner before it and said to myself, “here comes the gnarly section”? If you are thinking I might of tensed up a bit and slowed down a hair you are right! Why? With my improved skill and way, way better bike it was easy know! So I renamed it, “that fun, rocky section”. On my next run, as I railed the corner before the “fun, rocky section” instead of tensing up and slowing down I relaxed and threw in a few pedals! Five seconds faster and I moved up from 5th to 3rd!

You can put this into practice and make skill improvements stick and increase your confidence in you and your bike! Think about it, on a scale of 1-10 my skill from 1989 to 1998 had gone from a 1 to 7 and my bike had gone from a negative 1 to an 8, yet I was still looking at the trail like I was on that negative 1 bike with a skill level of 1! Don’t to this! It is hard not to do this though, do you have a rock like the one in the short video below or a section of trail that you have never made before? Well, you probably have a name for it, something like, “that gnarly section” or “widow maker” or that “f’ing. f’ing rock that always screws me up”. Well, let say your skills improve (because you took a BetterRide camp!) and now you ride that rock or section of trail for the first time. You didn’t get lucky, you know exactly how you did it, “I looked at the rock, spotted my line, looked to victory, manualed and shifted my weight” (just like in the video below). Well, now is the time to update your reptilian brain and make sure it knows how much better you have become!

Walk up to the rock/section of trail that used to riddle you and say to yourself, “wow, for 3/5/10 years I couldn’t make it over this rock, now it is easy, simply look at the rock, spot my line, look to victory, manual and shift my weight and I’m over it.” Then ride it again to cement in that it is now easy for you. This is a crucial step to making improvements stick! Think about it, for nine years I looked at the trail with the eyes of a beginner yet I had gone from beginner to pro racer! Simply because I had not upgraded my self-image as a mountain biker (despite great upgrading my skills and my bike!) I was not allowing myself to have the confidence I should of had!

A word of caution, often men feel they have way more skill than they actually do (especially when they are between 10 and 35ish) which is why about 90% of emergency room visits for traumatic physical injuries are young males, so over confidence is bad! Make sure your skill has honestly increased and your weren’t just lucky!

 

 

Luck vs. skill, update self image, crucial skill (that you can can start working on now!)

Mountain Bike Crash

Mountain Bike Crash, Coming Back From An Injury

Coming back from an injury, mountain bike crash or setback

I have gotten a lot of emails about this tough mental process and so far this year we have had six student cancellations because they injured themselves less than a week before their camp!  I think this is an area where many people struggle, certainly for me I have had a mountain bike crash or two (okay more like 10!) that effected my performance for months. (Most of the following was written in 2008, I have updated and edited it)

In the middle of writing this I wrecked, hurt myself pretty good and three weeks later (last weekend at the Colorado State Championships) I came back from it. This ordeal reminded me of a big point I almost left out. Those of you that have taken a camp from me know that I stress focusing on what you want to do, not what you don’t want to do. Well, my first run back (my first ride after three weeks off the bike was downhill practice at a race) I was a little worried that I might not be completely healed and didn’t want to re-injure myself. With this mindset I was thinking and focusing on not falling! After two sketchy runs I realized what I was doing and knew that my focus on not falling was hurting my confidence and making me focus on falling (the brain has to think about falling to “not fall”). I switched my focus to “ride my best and have fun” (which has nothing to do with falling) and my next three runs were better and better each time. This is a crucial step in coming back. It may be hard but you must focus on what you want to do, which is ride your best. Focusing on what you don’t want to do continues your focus on the negative which continues to depress your confidence. This is a vicious circle which is hard to break out of but it is very important if you want to overcome a setback.

“I have failed a lot more times than I have succeeded” that piece of wisdom comes from Michael Jordan. I will certainly agree with that, in my thirteen years as a pro racer I have won only two races. At the NORBA Nationals in the 1990′s only the top 70 pros qualified for the final, I finished 71 in the qualifiers four times and 72nd twice, ouch! In 2003 I had a frame snap in half while doing about 40 miles an hour at Angel Fire, that really hurt, four broken ribs and the wind knocked out of me. Events like these can quell your desire to ride or fire you up to learn from the event and try harder. How you deal with adversity is up to you and since you have sought out instruction I will give you some ways to overcome frustrating experiences and use them to become stronger.

Crashes, setbacks and mistakes are part of the learning process and can actually be a big step towards improving. The first thing to do is find the cause of the set back and determine if you were at fault or not. In the frame breaking incident I was definitely not at fault but in the qualifying 71st races I was at fault. As friend and fellow competitor Alex Morgan said, “Gene, for guys like us the qualifier is the race”. He said this because he saw me coast the last straight into the finish (to save energy for the final run) and two or three pedal strokes was all I needed to have finished in the top 70 and gotten a final run. Easy fix, next race treat the qualifier as a race and do my best.

If the mistake/crash was your fault fix the problem and then tell yourself, “well I fixed that problem, that will never happen again” and go back to having fun. If you crashed because you were over-trained, get some rest and prepare with more recovery for your next ride or race. If your mistake happened because you lost focus (the most common cause of wrecks), mediate and/or use imagery to improve your focus. Find reference points to keep your focus in that section of the course.

Sometimes the problematic event wasn’t your fault (like when my frame broke). In situations like this fix the problem (in my case I got a new, stronger frame) and again consciously put the problem behind you “well I fixed that problem, that will never happen again”.

Both of the comebacks strategies above require reprogramming both the conscious and subconscious brain. You have to literally replace fear with confidence using repeated logical reasoning to overwhelm your negative thought pattern.

Sometimes it is a series of mistakes that shakes your confidence or it just seems like dumb luck, such as when you you crest a hill and a big rock has rolled into your line. You see the rock but it is to late to change your line so you hit it and flip over. I hurt my leg pretty badly when this happened to me in Big Bear a few years ago. To over come this fall I used a combination of therapies, I used a “past history search” and imagery to rebuild my confidence. A “past history search” is simply remembering the times you rode successfully and confidently. I did this while imagining the drop where I flipped over at Big Bear. In all my previous runs I had nailed that section so I “rewound” my imagery and played the wreck over in my head. The first couple of times I visualized cresting the hill, seeing the rock and flipping over but then tucking and rolling without getting hurt. This made me feel a little better and more relaxed. Then I imaged seeing the rock, steering around it and making the section and could feel my body relax and my confidence start to return.

A past history search is a great confidence booster anytime you are feeling down, no matter what the cause. Sit back in a comfortable chair, close your eyes and relive your best moments. This will restore your confidence and really make you feel good about yourself.

 

How do you get your confidence back quickly, in the middle of a ride or race? A state change, forcing a smile, puffing your chest out and standing tall are simple ways that help regain confidence quickly. As is a little positive self talk, “that wasn’t like me, I am a really skilled rider, I have been riding really well, I am going to get back on my bike and ride like I own the trail!” These two methods combined can be very powerful.

Anchoring a performance cue is pro-active and powerful way to control your confidence a

Mountain bike crash

BetterRide student Jen Hanks knows about coming back from a setback, she came back from cancer!

nd help you quickly overcome setbacks. A performance cue is a short phrase and/or physical action (such as touching your thumb and middle finger together) that is associated (anchored) with a physiological state, feeling or emotion.

To anchor a personal cue you use a past history as mentioned above and add a few steps. Sit back in a comfortable chair, close your eyes and relive your three most confident events/moments of your life. When you won the spelling bee, conquered “widow maker hill for the first time”, finished your first race, won for the first time, etc. As you are reliving these moments really feel the emotions you were experiencing at the time, feel your back straighten as you proudly look out into the crowd. Feel your face flush as you can’t hold back a happy, satisfied grin, truly relive those moments. When you are feeling the positive, confident emotions created by reliving these moments “anchor” those emotions by doing the physical action you have chosen and/or repeating the short phrase you picked. With repetition you will anchor the feeling so strongly that by simply saying and or doing your performance cue you immediately enter the state that you have anchored.

Lastly, if you aren’t injured, remember to laugh, you are human, you make mistakes, big deal. Marla Streb put it best when I was trying to console her after a poor performance. She said, “Gene, its only a bike race, it not like we are saving lives”. That is good perspective.

“A champion isn’t someone who wins all the time. A Champion is someone who can suffer great adversity and come back to win again”

Yes, no matter which of the above methods you use it will take work but all things worth having (like peace of mind) require work. Knowledge is worthless without action!

MTB Skills

MTB Skills, How We Actually Learn/ Why “Experts” Often Make Poor Coaches

There has been an amazing amount written about MTB skills and our students are always asking me to write a book on mtb skills. My book is in the works but it is taking a lot of time because I want the book to actually help you become better, not fill your head with knowledge. Knowledge is worthless if you can’t put that knowledge into action on your bike!

Why is so hard to actually do a skill you understand? You read a well written article on the skill, you know Exactly how to do the skill, yet you still struggle, why? Put simply that is because the wrong part of your brain understands the skill. The part of your brain that read that MTB skills article has absolutely zero input in doing a physical skill, a completely different part of your brain handles physical skills. What you need to do is train the correct part of your brain to do the skill, which is hard/impossible to do by just reading or listening.

The book “Choke” covers this well and I will explain what 26 years of coaching people just like you and what Choke has taught me. I have always noticed a disconnect between “knowing” something and being able to “do” what you know (both in me and in our students). Choke explained the reasons for this better than anything else I have read on the subject and they actually use riding a bike as an example!

 

mtb skills

When Greg Minnaar works with us he makes me sign a contract saying that he is not a qualified mtb coach as he realizes he isn’t the best at coaching.

According to “Choke” as an expert gets better and better at doing a skill they start to forget stuff. Their example: “Think about riding a bike. How exactly do you do this? Well, yes, first you have to get on a bike and pedal. But there is a lot more to it than that. You have to balance, hold on to the handlebars, look at what is in front of you. If you miss any of these steps, falling is a real possibility. This usually doesn’t happen when proficient bike riders are actually riding, but if you were to ask a bike rider to explain the “how tos” of this complex skill, he would forget details. This is because the proficient bike rider is trying to remember information about bike riding that is kept as a procedural memory, as we psychologists term it.”

“Procedural memory is implicit or unconscious. You can think of procedural memory as your cognitive tool box that contains a recipe that, if followed, will produce a successful bike ride, golf putt, baseball swing …. Interestingly, these recipes operate largely outside of your conscious awareness. … because when you are good at performing a skill, you do it too quickly to monitor it consciously. …”

“Procedural memory is often distinguished from another form of memory: our explicit memory that supports our ability to reason on the spot or to recall the exact details of a conversation we had with our spouse the week before. … Simply put, explicit and procedural memories or largely housed in different parts of the brain …” More on those different parts of the brain in this article: You Aren’t Doing What You Know You are Supposed to Do!

So, how to we train our “procedural memory? Drills, with a focus on quality, not quantity! Remember, perfect practice makes perfect! Not just any drills of course, drills designed to get you doing the correct recipe. Our free mini-course has quite a few of these and our three day skills progressions are designed around specific drills to get you actually doing what we teach you.

What gets in our way when learning the correct way to do something? Our experience! If we are experienced but doing things incorrectly we have solid (but in correct) procedural memories. In this case being a complete beginner is better than an experienced rider when learning as the complete beginner has no procedural memory. The experienced rider has to weaken their incorrect procedural memory while strengthening the new, correct procedural memory.

So, do the drills from our mini-course and/or take a skills progression camp but most importantly do your drills!

Lastly, this why “skilled” athletes rarely make good coaches, they can’t access their procedural memory to articulate what they are doing. Think of the great athletes who have made lousy coaches, Michael Jordan, Wayne Gretzky, Magic Johnson, Mike Singletary, Ted Williams, Mike Ditka, Isiah Thomas, etc. as a matter of fact goggle “why “skilled” athletes rarely make good coaches” and there are a lot of articles on the topic!

character 2

Mountain Bike Your Best, Step by Step Plan

A simple, yet effective strategy to mountain bike your best that I learned from a restaurant manager at a former job. I was upset with the small volume of business we were doing, and hence my income as a bartender and my manager gave me some sage advice! Right in line with great teachers like Dan Millman and Abraham Lincoln, he said, “Gene, whether you are a janitor or president of the United States if you do your job to the best ability you will go home happy.” At the time I was young and I did the things I loved to the best my ability (I spent a small fortune on snowboard coaching and never missed a day of team practice) but often tried to just “get by” at things like that lame bartending job. Well, I took that to heart and it really changed my life! I put my best into that job everyday and it improved my life, my snowboarding and future jobs/businesses.

Mountain Bike at Your Best

Abe was wise!

How can this help you as a mountain biker? Well, it is so easy to make excuses to NOT do your best and just cruise through life seeking the easiest path. We are all prone to it, it is the new American dream, get rewarded for no effort, win the lottery, slip and fall in Wal-Mart and sue them for millions! I know you don’t consciously think that way but it is the prevailing attitude in our society and it is very hard not to be affected by it. I make the same excuses I hear my students say, “I’m too busy”, “if I put that much effort into it it won’t be fun, this is my escape, I don’t want it to become work”, “I’m just not a natural athlete“, etc. Then I get over it and start putting my heart and soul into!

Step 1: Realize fully that challenging yourself leads to happiness! Seriously, have you ever won something without effort? I’m sure were stoked but it wasn’t as powerful or long lasting as the stoke you got when you faced a big challenge and won! The easiest way is not the most enjoyable, rewarding and in the end, not the most fun way to go through life.

Step 2: Decide to be your best at mountain biking! Not my best, not your hero’s best, your best! Just saying, “I am committed to being my best everyday on my mountain bike!” probably puts a smile on your face and you want to take action, starting now!

Step 3: Commit to investing as much energy into your improvement that as you spend on your bike! Think about how much you spend on riding, bikes, clothes, gas, TIME, repairs, hospital bills, etc. Yet you have probably invested little to no time or money to honestly getting better.

Step 4: Read and study one/all of the following books and they will explain why riding everyday without structured practice will make you worse. All of these books talk about the importance of deliberate practice in improving at anything: The Talent Code, Talent is Overrated, Mastery, Outliers, Slow Practice Will Get You There Faster, Body Mind Mastery and pretty much any book on reaching your best.

Step 5: Realize that though you can ride trails better now than when you started you still aren’t as confident and skilled as you could be. Your instincts are great at hunting and gathering but terrible at mountain biking! Your instincts are thousands of years old and do terrible things like cause you to brake in a corner when you feel you are going to fast (about the worst thing you can do in a corner), your instincts cause you to look down when you bike slides or your in a rough rock garden (again, the worst thing you can do in those situations and you “know” to look ahead but your survival instincts won’t let you). Simply riding a little harder/faster each day does not make you better, it simply adapts you to your bad habits (at least for me and many of our students who took a camp after 5-30 years of “teaching” themselves), Bryson Martin, owner of DVO Suspension said this to Cedric Gracia (one of his sponsored athletes), “After over 30 years of riding this guy (pointing to me) taught me how to ride a bike.” My intent wasn’t to impress you with that comment, it was to impress upon you the importance of actually understanding the core skills of mountain biking and knowing how to get really good at those skills.

Step 6: Take one of our guaranteed, structured, skills progression camps. We are really good at helping you become much, much better and really want to help you! Pay attention, take notes and learn the core skills and drills to master those skills. It has worked for thousands of riders just like you, World Champions, National Champions, Pan American Champions, Olympic BMX Silver Medalists, riders with less experience than you and riders with more experience than you. (Coaching and coaching our coaches is what I focus on being my best at everyday, for the last 26 years!) This will be the best investment you have ever made in your riding or your money back.

Step 7: Practice! Actually practice, using structured drills with a purpose.

Step 8: Keep practicing! Amateurs practice until they get it right, pros practice until they can’t get it wrong! That is why the best athletes in the world spend 80-99% of their time practicing, not “doing” their sport! 99% of mountain bikers spend 100% of their mountain bike time doing and 0% practicing. Imagine practicing the correct, in balance, in control, efficient skills using drills for just 20 minutes three days a week! You would be riding much, much better in a very short amount of time!

Stop fooling yourself into thinking you just need to ride more to get better and start improving today by signing up for a BetterRide camp! We are here to help.

What can consistent deliberate practice do for you? Well, in my case, I’m 48 (racing age 49), not in great shape (haven’t done any leg work other than riding in over a year) but still managed a second place finish (behind Redbull Rampage legend Lance Canfield) on a gnarly track this weekend at Bootleg Canyon. As an old scared guy I finished ahead of a lot of much fitter, more fearless riders, nothing beats skills!

Do your drills, make everything we taught you second nature and you will be amazed at how confidently you ride ANY trail!