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Fear when mountain biking is good!

Mountain Bikers, How to Brake More Effectively, Video Tutorial

Using your front brake effectively is one of the most important skills on a mountain bike. Proper use of the front brake gives you much more control making you safer, faster and more confident. Now, when braking to cut speed (the main reason we use our front brake) you also want to use that weak rear brake to assist that powerful front brake. Watch my video tutorial and then read below for more detail on this important mtb skill.

An important piece I left out of the video is that you always want to cut speed in a straight line! Using that front brake and cutting speed in a corner is a recipe for disaster!

Your body position while braking is crucial and this often taught wrong (I taught it incorrectly from the start of BetterRide in the spring of 1999 until the fall of 2005)! What I taught and what I recently read from one of the best downhill racers in the world is, as you are braking get your weight back. This is terrible advice for a number of reasons (that I will address in a moment), so why did one of the best downhill racers in the world recommend this position? Because it feels like you are getting back when you are braking hard, what he is actually doing is bracing really hard so he doesn’t get tossed forward.

Granted, I used to get my weight back while braking and because it was such an ingrained habit! I still start to scout back sometimes when braking hard. It is also human instinct to move away from danger so it feels good to scoot back (until you crash :)).

There are a few reasons pushing your weight back while braking is bad (or pretty much any time except when manuling) :

  • It puts you in an off-balance and non-neutral position that I call the flying catapult! As your arms straighten and your butt goes back you end up at the end of your range of motion, with no “sag” in your body’s suspension. In this position, if your front wheel were to suddenly descend (drop or roll) more than a foot you will get yanked forward and downward causing your weight to get tossed forward. If you have ever had an endo where it felt like your bike catapulted you into the ground, it did (catapult you into the ground). Please check out this blog article on the importance of neutral, centered position on your bike: http://betterride.net/blog/2010/mountain-bike-desending-body-position-101-video-demonstration/
  • It greatly decreases your control and increases your braking distance (by taking weight off of the front wheel, not allowing you to use as much of that powerful front brake. This is easy to test (though a bit scary), simply to do the braking drill in my video on a dirt road or looser surface with your weight back. Instead of quickly coming to a stop, your front wheel will skid! See 6 second video below.
  • Usually, you are braking for a trail feature, most often on the straightaway into a corner, do you want to enter a corner with your weight back (no weight on the front wheel?). If the top downhill racer who recently said that you should shift your weight back while braking actually did that you would see him scoot back as he was braking for the corner, then, all in one motion, let go of the brakes, shift his weight forward and initiate the turn!
  • For more on this please read this article: http://betterride.net/blog/2014/braking-on-your-mountain-bike/

Speaking of the importance of using your front brake and braking in a straight line before a corner, a few years ago Cody Kelly (https://www.alchemy.bike/cody) was really excited to tell me that he is wearing out two sets of front brake pads before one set of rear brake pads! After hearing this I bowed to him and he said, “why are you bowing to me, you taught me to do that”. I replied that I may have taught him that (he took 5 or 6 of my camps) but I have 20 years of bad habits to overcome so I don’t exactly do that. In other words, I wasn’t practicing enough! The idea of wearing out two sets of front brake pads before one set of rear pads did inspire to practice more and while I don’t have Cody’s ratio for the last two years I have been wearing out one set of front pads before wearing out my rear pads!

Are you wearing out your front brake pads before your rear pads? Feel free to comment and/or ask any questions below.

Please share this article with anyone you feel could benefit from it.

 

 

MTB Foot Position, Video Tutorial

Mountain bike foot placement is a skill that will make you smoother and give you better balance. Check out my video below and then read my deeper break down of this important skill.

I can’t stress enough how important this is! Greg Minnaar and Aaron Gwin have their cleats mounted like mine (well, I copied them actually) for the optimum combination of power, balance, and smoothness on the bike. Please do the jumping drill and realize how bad it is to ride flat footed! Again, I like both pedal types for more on flat pedals vs. clips read this: https://wp.me/p49ApH-1ci

I took a balance class from Jim Klopman and Janet Miller (authors of a great book on balance, Balance is Power and owners of SlackBow, a balance training facility in Park City, UT) and I learned a lot (like my balance is decent but can get much. much better with practice, more on that in a future blog article) and a few things that I knew were reinforced. Both Jim and Janet really stressed that a big component of balance is being on the ball of your foot. I specifically asked if that was important on your bike’s pedals and they said something to the effect of, “if you want to be in balance it does!”

Famous motocross coach Gary Baily stresses being on the balls of your feet to be smooth on a dirt bike with 12″ of suspension travel! The jumping drill sums it up well. I have tested this on my bike many times and honestly, you lose ALL of your smoothness when you are standing on your arch. At places as rough as Bootleg Canyon or South Mountain, it makes riding downhill on rough trails nearly impossible.

Some riders tend to ride with their toes angled out a bit and others with their toes in. I think this is more about how your body is built and doesn’t affect performance.

When coasting you want the pedals relatively level and in the 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock position. Often, on flat pedals, riders will drop the heel of their front foot a bit and raise the heel of their trailing foot creating a “cradle” to help keep their feet from sliding on the pedals. Of course, some good, 5.10 shoes and a good pair of flat pedals like the Canfield Brothers Crampons really help! Many, many great riders have told me that they drop their heels, other than dropping the heal on their front foot sometimes I rarely see them doing this, I think it feels that way to them (and we certainly don’t want our front heel up!)

Spend some time on mellow descents, or better yet, paved mellow descents focusing on keeping your weight on the balls of your feet! Your body, rims, and shocks will thank you!

Now, go out and practice! Let us know how this has affected your riding by posting below. Feel free to share this article with anyone you feel could benefit from it.

Mountain Bike Bump Jump, Video Tutorial

Mountain Bike Bump Jump, Video Tutorial

Today’s two-minute video tip (closer to three minutes actually) is on one of my favorite skills! The bump jump is an almost zero energy replacement for the bunny hop, as long as there is a bump available. I first learned this following World Champion Myles Rockwell in practice at the Mount Snow NORBA National in 1996. It has become a staple in my riding ever since.

First, watch the video and then read my more detailed tutorial below.

 

Another thing I learned from a great racer and teammate, Ryan Sutton was not to take the smooth line fast but to take the fast line smooth. This should be every mountain bikers motto as it pays off big! What this means is often the fastest line may be rougher but if you can do it smoothly it will be faster and more efficient. An example is going around the “root ball” of a tree. Often, a tree’s roots are spread out in a half circle six feet or more away from the tree. So if the trail goes right next to the tree you have to make a six foot detour to go around the roots. What if you floated over those roots in a straight line instead? That would be more efficient, faster and most of all more fun!

Roots aren’t the only thing that can be bump jumped, I’ve used on three-foot diameter logs on the old Purgatory Downhill track in Durango, over a series of roots and rocks in Angel Fire, NM, over tall roots in the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia (the wetter the climate the more the roots are above ground) and I use it probably 5-10 times a day on the rough trails of Moab.

Here is a deeper breakdown of the bump jump.

  • Start with enough speed to clear the obstacle.
  • Approach the bump coasting, standing in a centered neutral position (weight pressing into the pedals, hinged at the hips, chest down in a “half pushup” position) while looking ahead (looking to your landing, not looking at your bump).
  • Gently load your front suspension by pushing down with your hands (straightening your arms a few inches)
  • Time it so you finish the “loading” just before impact with the bump (a root, rock, stump, anything 1-3 inches high that won’t move, the more square the better.

  • Let the impact bounce your wheel into the air and push your hands back up the amount you pushed down or more if you need more height

  • As hands are being pushed up, start to load your rear suspension by extending your legs a bit. This is a crucial step as you need to bounce the rear wheel over the bump also. Many riders when learning this instinctively do a “cheater bunny hop” as the front wheel is popping up. DON’T do that. If you yank the rear wheel up you are A. wasting energy but more importantly B. You are starting to fly when your rear wheel is a bike length from the first bump, you have greatly shortened the distance of your bump jump. Be patient and let that wheel hit the bump.
  • As the rear tire hits the bump, relax your legs and let the bump push your knees towards your chest. This will level out your flight. Also, keep your goal in mind, if it is distance, practice getting as little height as possible and practically skimming over the tops of the obstacles. If your goal is height pop a little harder by compressing a little deeper (this is a really subtle move though, compress too hard and you will just slow yourself down, getting the right compression takes a few attempts!)
  • Relax and fly! As you get better at bump jumping you can focus on getting “backside” when you are landing. Instead of plopping down hard out of the sky if you can set your rear tire down on the back edge of a root, log or rock you can use that like a landing ramp and get a little acceleration and a smoother landing. (Again, with practice, coming up short can end badly!) mountain bike Bump Jump 4

With a little practice, this will become one of your favorite skills. If you are more comfortable clipped in learn it that way but, once you are confident with the bump jump practice with flat pedals, they will give you a much better feel for the timing.

This should feel easy and like you are letting it happen. There is no pulling, yanking or much effort at all. It is all about the timing.

I hope you learned a lot from this tutorial, let me know about your bump jumps in the comments. If you know anyone who would benefit from this tutorial feel free to share it. Tune in next week for my next two-minute tip on the most important part of body position. It will get you riding stronger with more comfort!

Learn From Aaron Gwin's Amazing Run

Mountain Bike Riders, Learn From Aaron Gwin’s Amazing Run

All mountain bikers can learn a lot from Aaron Gwin’s winning run at Mont Sainte Anne this year. You don’t have to be into downhill mountain biking or even enjoy it to learn from this amazing run.

If you don’t know much about this incredible feat I will give you the backstory. (if you know the story or just want to cut to the chase skip down to below the video) In World Cup downhill racing to build drama, in the final run, the race order goes from slowest qualifier to the fastest qualifier (they have a qualifying “race” the day before the actual race and the 80 fastest racers “qualify” to race in the finals).  This year in Mount Saint Anne Aaron Gwin needed to qualify and race well to stay in the overall points chase. He did just that, but it gets better!

After the first 60 racers (those who qualified 80th to 21st) race there is a 20 minute break to make sure the camera crews, live feed and live timing are working for the final 20 fastest qualifiers. Well, those first 60 racers at great track conditions, beautiful, sunny weather! During the break, it started raining and the rain kept getting harder. By the time the 20th qualifier started the track was a muddy mess. The first 10 or so racers after the break really struggled to get down safely, much less quickly.

Everyone thought the real race was pretty much over, the top qualifiers were not going to even finish in the top 10! Then, 9th place qualifier Jack Moir put down a pretty fast run despite the rain and mud giving us a little hope but it still seemed like a long shot. 3rd place qualifier and current World Cup points leader had a miserable run!

Loic Bruni, second place qualifier had a great run but was still two seconds behind the leader Dean Lucas who had raced in dry conditions. Aaron Gwin was the last man on the hill and it wasn’t looking good for him but, he didn’t seem to care. He stormed out of the start gate and attacked that track like it was dry! He took inside lines, looked smooth and relaxed and had one of the all-time great runs in the history of downhill mountain bike racing!

Lesson 1.  Intention! Aaron decided to ride his best and give it is all! He was obviously focused the entire time and didn’t change his riding due to the weather, he rode the track as if it were dry!

Intention is everything! If you ride to not fall, like Greg Minnaar did your whole focus is on falling (“darn, remember the last time I fell, that hurt …”) and you are lacking confidence. (more on Greg’s big mistake and how you can learn from it here: http://betterride.net/blog/2017/greg-minnaars-big-mistake-last-world-cup-learn/ ) Turns out when you lack confidence your coordination drops considerably too! So always focus on what you want to do, not what you don’t want to! If all you can think about is not falling, that is a good time to get off your bike and walk that section! As you walk it try and figure what is scaring you and then “baby-step” your way up to doing it (find a similar but easier/safer feature or trail section become confident and work your way up)!

Always ride with a positive focus, “I want to get to the bottom of this trail as smoothly as possible”, “my goal is to keep my chin up and look ahead”, “I’m a billy goat!”, etc. I’m going to crush this steep, rocky climb!” Never ride with a negative focus, “I hope I make it”, “just don’t crash”. etc.

Lesson 2. Learn the ADVANCED mountain bike skills like looking ahead, good descending body position (staying in balance, hinged at the hips, weight on his pedals, in balance cornering technique and using his body as suspension). Wait! Those are all basic skills! Seriously, please watch the video and note when he does an advanced skill and comment below (“Gene, at 1:42 (or whatever time he does the “advanced skill”) into is run he does …., that is an advanced skill …). Other than a short “manual” over a ditch (which is still a basic skill) where are those advanced skills?

Aaron Gwin has mastered the basics! That is what all sports are about! Mastering the basics is the absolute key to reaching your potential as a mountain biker. I know Aaron can scrub jumps and probably do a few other advanced skills but he uses none of those in this race!

Now, I’m not saying you could beat Aaron Gwin if you mastered the basics, Aaron Gwin is also SUPER fit and has an incredible mental game too, both of which also contributed to this amazing run. However, imagine how well you could ride if you mastered the basics!

So, focus on DOING the basics, not simply knowing them! We all know to look ahead, but are you doing 100% of the time? Even on a trail as gnarly as that World Cup track?

Heres to creating your best year yet in 2018!

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