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cody kelly has mountain bike skills

BetterRide MTB Camp Grads Tear Up the Sea Otter! (while their coach just gets older and slower! :) )

BetterRide MTB Camp Grads Tear Up the Sea Otter! (while their coach just gets older and slower! :) )

Wow, what a weekend! While I was busy coaching a fun group of riders here in Moab quite a few of former campers were either winning races or landing on the podium at the Sea Otter Classic!

So stoked to see my students chasing their dreams and amazed to see that at least one “BetterRider” was in the top 4 of every gravity event at Sea Otter!

Cornering powerhouse Mitch Ropelato (SRAM) won the Sea Otter Dual Slalom in style! Congratulations Mitch! Another Gold for your huge trophy case!

Video of Mitch racing Kyle Warner here (courtesy of Kyle Warner) ! https://www.facebook.com/Kwmtb/videos/1347650138614481/

Former Sea Otter Dual Slalom Champion Cody Kelly (Yeti) earned a third place finish is the pumptrack race! Cody was also 14th in the Downhill! Great work Cody, looking forward to seeing your best season yet!

Mitch Ropelato and Cody Kelly in the fastest ever  BetterRide Camp, 2009?

Mitch Ropelato (White Fox Jersey) and Cody Kelly (yellow helmet behind Mitch) in the fastest ever BetterRide Camp, 2009?

Wow, the photo brings back found memories! Jackie and Dante Harmony, Heikki Hall, Szymon Kowalski and Will Collins. Nearly 10 years ago, wow, how time flys.

Mike Day (Giant Bicycles) is back from retirement and raced his way to 2nd place in the Downhill and Kiran Mackinnon (Santa Cruz) earned a 4th place finish. Congratulations to both of you! I’m impressed!

Mike Day’s teammate on Giant Bikes, McKay Vezina pedaled and pumped his way to 4th in the Enduro!  McKay is off to fast start this season as he was 15th in the Downhill and finished 21st in the second Enduro World Series of the season. Keep it up McKay!

What a great weekend! Hoping yours was filled with challenge, triumph (you gave it your best!) learning and fun!

 

Braking on your mountain bike

Never Flat Again On Your Mountain Bike!

That’s right, I have found the way to never flat again on your mountain bike while still running low enough pressure for the best control, traction and shock absorption! I didn’t invent this nor am I going to make a nickel off this but I have to share it!

My last flat on my downhill bike was a week ago on my last practice run on Saturday for the Chili Challenge race at Angel Fire Resort! I don’t plan on ever flatting again! After front flatting on the fastest part of the race track I was mad, tired (from the long walk down) and frustrated. Then a friend said the magic words, “they have a couple sets of Procore by Schwalbe at the bike shop”. (disclaimer, I have no affiliation with Schwalbe tires, and they know nothing of this post) Procore is basically a mini-tube and tire that you inflate to 85 psi inside of your tubeless tire that keeps the tire from bottoming on your rim, eliminating pinch flats.

I have been waiting for this for two years and was so excited that they had that I paid full retail to get a set in my tires! One my first practice run on Sunday I was glad I did! I saw the rock coming,  square edged and almost as big as a cinder block, I knew I was going to hear a loud ping and then the sound of air rushing out of my tire! Except, it didn’t happen, there was no ping (despite hitting the rock so hard it stole 70% of my speed and nearly endoed) and the tire stayed inflated! I was stoked! This system is amazing, quite possibly the best mtb invention since the dropper post!

IF you like running low pressure and hate flatting check out Procore! http://www.schwalbe.com/en/schwalbe-procore.html

They do add 200 grams a wheelset but they have tires that are 200 grams lighter than regular tires made for this system. Including one of my favorite confidence inspiring tires, the Magic Mary.

Mountain biking

Mountain Biking, Make Skill Improvements Stick! Forever! Starting Now!

When mountain biking we often overlook crucial mental skills that help us use our physical skills better and more confidently. The mistake we will work on today I have nicknamed, “Riding with Fully Rigid Eyes”.

I came up with the name, “Fully Rigid Eyes” when I realized I was looking at the trail with the same “eyes” as I did on my first mtb ride in 1989! It was 1998, nine years later and my skill and my equipment was head and shoulders better than it was in 1989 but I was looking at the trail like I did on that first ride (on a fully rigid mountain bike)!

Let me explain the situation and how you can use this to help make your mountain biking skill increases “stick” and become much more confident. From 1994-1998 (dates might be off my a year) the first downhill race of the year for me was down the Porcupine Rim Climb (Starting at the Top of “Lazy Man’s and finishing by the stock tanks on Sand Flats road). I always walk the trails I race and memorize them (where I do EVERYTHING, where I brake, where I let off the brakes, where it get’s rocky, the lines I take, where I shift, where I sprint, etc.) and to help remember the track I make up names for each section (the fast section, the steep section, the wooded section, etc). At this race there was a rock garden which I called the “gnarly section” and on my hardtail with 1.5″ of fork travel up front and a 120 mm stem it was kind of gnarly.  However, by 1998 I had a 6″ travel full suspension bike, a 60 mm stem and my skills were much better than in 1994 (and way better than in 1989!).

On to the race! There I was, blasting through the “Gnarly Section” on my sweet Yeti/Lawwill Straight 6 with a big grin on my face. As I crossed the finish line after my first run it occurred to me, it isn’t gnarly anymore! At this race I always got a minimum of ten practice runs and the promoter gave us two race runs so by my race run in 1998 I had 50 practice runs and 10 race runs on that track! In that time I never crashed in that “gnarly section”. If you can make something 60 times out of 60 attempts, it must not be too gnarly! But, I was still calling it the gnarly section! What do you think I was thinking as I railed the corner before it and said to myself, “here comes the gnarly section”? If you are thinking I might of tensed up a bit and slowed down a hair you are right! Why? With my improved skill and way, way better bike it was easy know! So I renamed it, “that fun, rocky section”. On my next run, as I railed the corner before the “fun, rocky section” instead of tensing up and slowing down I relaxed and threw in a few pedals! Five seconds faster and I moved up from 5th to 3rd!

You can put this into practice and make skill improvements stick and increase your confidence in you and your bike! Think about it, on a scale of 1-10 my skill from 1989 to 1998 had gone from a 1 to 7 and my bike had gone from a negative 1 to an 8, yet I was still looking at the trail like I was on that negative 1 bike with a skill level of 1! Don’t to this! It is hard not to do this though, do you have a rock like the one in the short video below or a section of trail that you have never made before? Well, you probably have a name for it, something like, “that gnarly section” or “widow maker” or that “f’ing. f’ing rock that always screws me up”. Well, let say your skills improve (because you took a BetterRide camp!) and now you ride that rock or section of trail for the first time. You didn’t get lucky, you know exactly how you did it, “I looked at the rock, spotted my line, looked to victory, manualed and shifted my weight” (just like in the video below). Well, now is the time to update your reptilian brain and make sure it knows how much better you have become!

Walk up to the rock/section of trail that used to riddle you and say to yourself, “wow, for 3/5/10 years I couldn’t make it over this rock, now it is easy, simply look at the rock, spot my line, look to victory, manual and shift my weight and I’m over it.” Then ride it again to cement in that it is now easy for you. This is a crucial step to making improvements stick! Think about it, for nine years I looked at the trail with the eyes of a beginner yet I had gone from beginner to pro racer! Simply because I had not upgraded my self-image as a mountain biker (despite great upgrading my skills and my bike!) I was not allowing myself to have the confidence I should of had!

A word of caution, often men feel they have way more skill than they actually do (especially when they are between 10 and 35ish) which is why about 90% of emergency room visits for traumatic physical injuries are young males, so over confidence is bad! Make sure your skill has honestly increased and your weren’t just lucky!

 

 

Luck vs. skill, update self image, crucial skill (that you can can start working on now!)

mountain biking too much

Mountain Biking Advice from the Most Respected Motocross Coach!

What mountain biking advice does Gary Bailey have that can help you? What he says to all his students (which applies to all riders that want to reach their best):

“It all comes down to this; practice. What is it? Practice is not a race. It’s also not time to go out and just bust out laps. It’s time to figure out where your problems are and what you need to do to fix them. Then you must have the discipline to go work on that problem until you have it better. Like all other sports, practice is not going out and playing the game, rather, in practice, whether it be baseball, soccer, basketball or any other sport, practice is when you work on drills to improve your skills. In motocross too this is what practice should be. Unfortunately, for most though, they practice motocross by just riding laps and this not what you should be doing and will not improve your motocross skills. Rather, you will just repeat the same bad form and bad habits lap after lap. -Gary Bailey”

Rick Practicing is mountain bike skills

BetterRide camper Rick practicing his cornering skills!

Here is Rick on trail after learning and doing drills on pavement. Almost there just needs to lead with that outside elbow like he did on the pavement.

Here is Rick on trail after learning and doing drills on pavement. Almost there just needs to lead with that outside elbow like he did on the pavement.

 

He even talks about Perfect Practice later in the article. This means it is time for you to stop just riding and actually start practicing! Soon you will be driving your bike (active) instead of riding your bike (passive)! Don’t know what to practice? Don’t know how to practice it? We are here to help you!

Practicing means focusing on one particular aspect of a skill using drills and quality repetition (not quantity, which can get sloppy) to master it. Can your corner on pavement (where there is no great traction and no fear of sliding out, hitting a tree or going off the edge of a trail) as well as our guest coach Greg Minnaar does on off-camber loose dirt? When we first coached many of our World and National Champion students they could not corner like Greg anywhere. Through understanding and practicing body position and vision first, then understanding how and why to do each of the 10 elements of cornering, doing drills on pavement and finally applying on dirt what they learned through their drills they now corner as well as Greg Minnaar on dirt! Of course most of our students don’t have world championship goals, they simply want to ride more efficiently, in balance and in control with more confidence on the toughest of their local trails. Deliberate practice is the way to do that!