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mtb skills

MTB Cornering, Braking and Setting Up to Corner

MTB Cornering, Braking and Setting Up to Corner

Interesting braking and mtb cornering question asked by one of our students:

“Just a quick follow up question.  I have been having a problem getting out of position before cornering, primarily caused by hard braking (especially if there are rough terrain before the corner or if I come in too hot).  As I brake, my body gets behind the center and lower as well, and by the time I start entering the corner, I am out of the “attack” position.  My front wheel feels light, and it becomes difficult to get in the correct cornering body position.

If you have suggestions as to how to properly transition from braking into cornering (especially under hard braking), I would appreciate it.”

Interesting question, I have been working on the same issue, especially last weekend at Bootleg Canyon. The problem stems from getting back while we brake, getting low is good but we need to stay more centered so when we release the brakes and the bike accelerates we are centered and ready to attack the corner.  I was taught the old school, “get way back while you brake” which does help the rear brake a bit but actually hurts the effectiveness of the much more powerful front brake.  Getting back also puts me out of balance and makes it hard to corner correctly (straightening my arms which puts me in a non-neutral position, shifting my weight back and taking weight off the front tire).  My main focus at the last two races has been to stay centered as I brake, use A LOT of front brake and then let off and attack the corner. Believe me, the entrances to these corners are really rough and brake bumped, but you can still stay centered. When working with Greg Minnaar he really stresses this has it is the only way to stay in control as you brake. It sounds scary but once you do it you realize two things: 1. you can brake in a much shorter distance with more control (more weight on the front wheel means no front wheel slide which means you can brake harder if needed) 2. you are in a much better position to corner when you let off the brakes. This is another reason to practice the braking drills from the camp you took with us.

MTB Cornering

Aaron Gwin, low and looking way ahead!

In our next cornering article we will talk about line choice for cornering but something you can put into practice today is to stop talking the Lemming line. Lemmings are those little creatures that blindly follow each other off ice cliffs to their death and mountain bikers have a habit of doing the same thing (not to their death but definitely to their determent). When riding don’t always follow the “dominate line” (the most worn in/used path), it is often not the best choice for you. When entering a corner often the Lemming line is full of brake bumps and right in the middle of the trail, if you are doing a good job of  looking ahead as you enter the corner you might notice that just to the outside of that dominate, brake bumped line there is a nice smooth line! That smooth line is better for braking, better for your suspension, won’t beat you up as much and it might just give you a better entrance point for the corner! Give that a try and let us know how it works for you.

More on cornering: Mountain Bike Cornering, Part 1

As always it comes down to doing drills to master skills, then practicing with purpose and a focus on quality!

Create a railed corner (or two)!

mtb skills

Cornering Your Mountain Bike, Get Low, Not Forward!

There is a lot of misleading advice for cornering your mountain bike, often from top racers who aren’t actually doing what they say they are doing! Greg Minnaar and I got a kick out of Myles Rockwell’s announcing at the world championships a few years ago. Myles was talking about Greg’s “forward” riding style. Greg will tell you that he rides centered with all of his weight on the pedals (and this is a case of top racer actually doing what he says he is doing). He is “forward” of being “back on the bike”? Yes, but he is not “forward” of centered on his bike. (Myles is a great rider (world champion!) and super nice guy, no offense was meant by this post, this is an excellent example of top athletes not being the best at explaining things (because it is not their job!)).

Cornering Centered

Greg in 2010 at Fort William, centered, balanced , fast and consistent!

This is a case of perception being distorted by “society”. In this case the 1980’s and 1990’s mountain biking “society” that was used to riders riding with their weight back (that, long stems, and narrow bars are why if you watch a downhill race video from 1995 or prior you will see tons of pro racers who look wobbly and out of control) created the expectation of seeing a rider in that weight back position, so when Greg (and Neko Mullay, Aaron Gwin, Rat Boy, etc.) rides centered he looks forward to riders expecting to see 1993 body position. This is because the rider’s head and chest are forward and low, but, their hips have scooted back, keeping them centered over the pedals. An important part of body position is “hinging at the hips” with a flat back. When you hinge your chest drops and goes forward as your hips go back so you stay centered. This puts you in a balanced, neutral and athletic position so you can respond to anything the trail throws at you, quickly and powerfully! It also lowers your center of gravity! Watch video of the world cups and notice how low Aaron Gwin, Steve Smith and Neko Mullay are. Like a sports car, getting low helps you stay centered (braking, cornering and acceleration forces have less effect on a lower rider and/or vehicle).

cornering centered

Here is Greg in that same centered position going straight. Notice his “hinged” hips and flat back!

Focus on getting low! A great way to practice this is to ride straight down a smooth road and focus on hinging at the hip with a flat back and dropping your chest until you are in a half push-up position. Next make sure you have heavy feet and light hands (check if you are in the right position by loosening your grip and  sliding your hands side to side on the grips, if your hands won’t move you are too far forward, if it feel like you are pulling up on the grips you are too far back). Once you are solid at doing this in a straight line focus on maintaining this low, centered (fore-aft) position while turning in both directions. Once you are consistent at this then try cornering on pavement with weight too far back, then too far forward, then centered again. You will feel that your bike feels lighter and takes less effort to change direction when you are centered. When are are consistent at all of the above, keep practicing until you can’t get it wrong! More on cornering!

Get low! Corner your mountain bike

Aaron Gwin, low, centered and looking way ahead!

 

Mountain Bikers

Setting Up to Rail a Corner On Your Mountain Bike

Setting up to rail a corner on your mountain bike! Interesting braking and cornering question asked by one of our students:

“Just a quick follow up question.  I have been having a problem getting out of position before cornering, primarily caused by hard braking (especially if there is rough terrain before the corner or if I come in too hot).  As I brake, my body gets behind the center and lower as well, and by the time I start entering the corner, I am out of the “attack” position.  My front wheel feels light, and it becomes difficult to get in the correct cornering body position.

If you have suggestions as to how to properly transition from braking into cornering (especially under hard braking), I would appreciate it.”

Interesting question, this is a common problem with riders of all experience levels. I spent a lot of time working on the same issue a few years ago and still practice braking a couple of times a week for this reason. The problem stems from getting back while you brake, getting low is good but we need to stay  centered so when we release the brakes and the bike accelerates we are centered and ready to attack the corner. Although we stress a centered braking position in our skills progressions I was taught the old school, “get way back while you brake” and it is plain instinctual to move away from danger. Staying centered while braking took me a while to master and if I stop practicing it I find myself reverting to scooting back as I brake. Scooting back does help the rear brake a bit but actually hurts the effectiveness of the much more powerful front brake.   Getting back also puts you out of balance and makes it hard to corner correctly.  A great on trail drill is to focus on staying centered as you brake for a corner. Use A LOT of front brake, only brake in a straight line before the corner and then let off and attack the corner.

 

Rail a Corner on your mountain bike

BetterRide student Matt showing proper body position (centered and neutral) for descending and braking.

Stay centered and you will brake more effectively. When working with World Champion Greg Minnaar he really stresses this. It sounds scary but once you do it you realize two things: 1. you can brake in a much shorter distance with more control (less front wheel slide) 2. you are in a much better position to corner when you let off the brakes. This is another reason to practice the braking drills from the camp you took with us.

One of our fastest students, Cody Kelly (who won the Sea Otter Dual Slalom this year) told me that he now wears out two sets of front brake pads for every set of rear pads! That should be every riders goal! The steeper and/or looser the terrain the more you have to rely on your front brake.

As always it comes down to doing drills to master skills then practicing with purpose and a focus on quality! Have you practiced the braking drill from our mini-course recently?

Pro Tip:  Now that you are in the right body position where and how you do you braking is very important. ALWAYS brake in a straight line! In other words, finish your braking before you start your corner! Your tires can’t multitask, asking them to slow you down in one direction while asking them to change direction at the same time is a recipe for disaster. Have you noticed all those braking bumps on the entrance to the corner? Well, why are you riding in them? Usually there is a nice smooth section of trail just to the outside of those braking bumps, use the smooth part of the trail!

Create a railed corner (or two)! Stay tuned for next weeks article on line choice for cornering!

Stop being one with your bike!

Stop Being One With Your Bike! (Mountain Bike Better Today.)

Stop Being One With Your Bike! Mountain Bike Better Today.

The most common mistake I see riders making is being one with their bikes. You don’t want to do what your bike is doing! Ever get “eyeball jiggle” (when your eyes are bouncing and you can’t focus on the trail)? Ever feel like the trail is bucking you or that you handlebars are being yanked out of your hands? These are all symptoms of being one with your bike. Mentally you may want to be one with your bike but not physically! Watch a skilled rider go through a rough section of trail, their bike is all over the place (wheels bouncing, rear end kicking up, frame jerking up, down and sideways) but their chest and head are barely moving! This is because they are letting the bike move beneath them, being “separate” from their bike.

What causes you to be one with your bike (other than bad advice)? Fear, your instinct to move away from danger, riding above your skill level (riding a trail you are not confident to ride or riding faster than you are comfortable), lack of knowledge of proper body position (or knowledge of proper body position but not using proper body position because you haven’t ingrained proper body position with deliberate practice) all lead to being stiff and one with your bike. This leads to locked arms, stiff legs, possibly squeezing the seat with your thighs and bouncing all over the trail.

How do you fix this? Relax! Muscle tension causes your body to be stiff making it hard to absorb shock and let the bike move beneath you. The best mountain bike suspension ever made is your body! Your legs and arms have way more than 8” of suspension travel and that travel is instantaneous and well dampened (no need to adjust compression or rebound). So relax and use your body! How do you relax? Smile, smiling releases endorphins which relax us! Ride with a loose grip on the bars, death griping the bars effectively locks your arms with muscle tension (muscle tension also robs you of energy). Ride trails you can confidently ride! Riding trails that scare you will not make you better! Scary trails will make you feel less confident and lucky, when not confident you resort to survival instincts (like braking in a corner when going to fast or straightening out your arms while shifting your weight back when scared), not proper skills. Here is a photo of Ned, one of our students “driving his bike past a rider relying on instincts and being “one with his bike”. Notice how Ned is separate from his bike, centered and neutral.

Stop being one with your bike! Mountain bike better today

Ned “driving” his bike, separated, balanced and ready for what ever the trail throws at him.

Next, bend those elbows and knees to put you in a neutral position. Suspension has “sag” for a reason, your fork and rear suspension (if you have suspension) move both up and down to keep your wheels on the ground. You need to do the same! With straight arms and legs you can absorb upward forces but you will get yanked down small ledges as you “plop” down instead of gently rolling down. An excellent way to feel this and a drill to help ingrain this is: Find a set of stairs that you can comfortably roll down (not scary to you!). Roll down those stair with your arms straight, squeezing the seat your thighs while death griping the bars. Then roll down those stairs a second time smiling with your knees bent, elbows bent into a half push up position, knees bent, a loose grip on the bars and a lowered seat. You will be amazed at the difference! Once you feel how much better it is to be relaxed and supple practice this on stairs, rock ledges, bumpy sections of trail, etc. Really focus on one aspect of this (loose grip or knees bent or smiling or elbows bent, etc.) and practice until you can’t get it wrong! Remember, “Amateurs practice until they get it right, pros practice until they can’t get it wrong! Here is a great shot of Austin with knees and elbows bent, separate from his bike and completely in control!

Stop being one with your bike!

BetterRide student Austin Gooder riding with great form in Downeville

For more on body position and video showing both poor, “one with your bike” position and good separate from your bike position check out this blog post: http://betterride.net/blog/2010/mountain-bike-desending-body-position-101-video-demonstration/

I hope this has helped. Now put down your computer and go practice!