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cody kelly has mountain bike skills

What You Know (correctly) About Mountain Bike Skills is Hurting You!

I’m not kidding or trying to be controversial when I say, “What You Know (correctly) About Mountain Bike Skills is Hurting Your Progress!” Let’s say you know to ride in balance in the correct body position, how could that possibly be hurting you?  The answer is simple, if you are like I was when I first turned pro you aren’t doing what you know! Also, again, like me, you might know 50-80% of the skill but are probably missing a few/a lot of the details of that skill.

Knowledge can be a scary thing as it often makes us feel competent when we aren’t. An example of this in my first 10 years of riding   and in nearly every rider I see on trail (from beginners to pro cross-country racers) is the skill of looking ahead. We all know to look ahead, heck I came from snowboard racing background and then snowboard coaching background, I won a lot of races looking ahead and taught told the athletes I coached to do the same. The scary thing is, as a mountain biker I wasn’t looking ahead on trail, maybe sometimes (when it was easy) but I finally realized I was looking down, a lot! That is the trap of knowledge and why I say knowledge is worthless without action. What good is knowing how to do something if you aren’t doing it? When needed! We teach our students HOW to look ahead and provide drills to master this mountain bike skill.

cody kelly has mountain bike skills

BetterRide student Cody Kelly showing what practice can do for your mountain bike skills!

A couple of students summed this up pretty well, one,  Peter Tsang  in this review on mtbr:  http://reviews.mtbr.com/review-betterride-three-day-mountain-bike-skills-camp and another, Matt MacKay in his comments after reading the article. Matt wrote, “I can’t say enough good things about this camp. I went to Las Vegas in February to ride in Gene’s camp, and like the reviewer, I had knowledge of a lot of what was being taught. However the structure of the camp and Gene’s teaching style brought all of that knowledge and technique together. All of the pieces fell into place, and seemingly overnight I was a better rider. There is still a lot of learning for me to do. But now I know what my mistakes are and how to fix them.” (you can read his entire comment on mtbr) A real simple way of saying this is both Peter and Matt were not doing what they know (at least not very well).

We do this a lot in life, especially on our mountain bikes (Were you looking ahead in the last rock garden you encountered? The entire way?) because our big brain knows how to do something we think we are doing it! The problem is we don’t use our conscious, thinking brain to do anything athletically. We rely on our subconscious “autopilot” and it needs structured repetition to first understand and then master a skill. Even once we master a skill if we don’t use structured practice we will soon use the sharpness of that skill!

Rick Practicing is mountain bike skills

BetterRide camper Rick practicing his cornering skills!

So, once you learn, hear and/or read about a skill take the time to drill it into your body (after making sure the skill is correct!). There is an old saying sports, “Amateurs practice until they get it right and pros practice until they can’t get it wrong”. Sadly, 95% of mountain bikers have never practiced at all, they just go out and ride. Practice is the way to create your best ride yet!

Here is Rick on trail after learning and doing drills on pavement. Almost there just needs to lead with that outside elbow like he did on the pavement.

Here is Rick on trail after learning and doing drills on pavement. Almost there just needs to lead with that outside elbow and look further through the corner like he did on the pavement. A few more sessions of drills and he will be solid!

BetterRide Student Aaron Mattix Palisade Ride

BetterRide Mountain Bike Skills Students Continue to Amaze Us! The Ultimate Upgrade?!

BetterRide Mountain Bike Skills Students Continue to Amaze Us! Whether it is an 81-year-old student finishing the Leadville 100 in 13 hours, a passionate rider hitting a step up that previously kicked his butt, a 65-year-old riding steeps and drops with ease or a young racer entering his first full World Cup season on the Specialized/Monster Energy team we are inspired by our students. Reaching your best is hard work and takes consistent deliberate practice, something they have to make time for and commit to despite their busy schedules.  Over the last few weeks we have witnessed our students riding at their best and gotten so many emails, facebook posts and phone calls that I thought I would share a few stories, photos and links with you.

Professional trail builder and beard farmer Aaron Mattix posted an interesting review of his camp and what has happened to his riding in the two years since. At first he was pretty bummed to be doing drills on pavement but goes on to say this: “My bike still has its fair share of parts that need replaced, but now that I have the knowledge, drills, and experience from Gene’s camp, I can continue to upgrade my riding level, which is the ultimate upgrade.” It is a really fun read and cool to see one of our camps from a students prospective:  http://localstash.net/2014/04/2-years-later-better-ride-camp-review/  The rest of blog is great too, really heart-felt and often entertaining.

 

BetterRide Student Aaron Mattix Palisade Ride

Aaron Mattix having fun in Palisades, Colorado!

Dale Watterson posted this on our facebook page the other day:

“Awesome time at Over the Edge Sports bike festival this weekend. I got to apply more things I learned from my Better Ride class and was able to clear a step up and sand pit that had previously kicked my butt. Thanks again Dante and Jackie.”

BetterRiders had a great showing at the KHS/Five Ten Reaper Madness at Bootleg Canyon in Boulder City. We had students on the podium in all pro classes and tons of fast amateurs on the podium too, including an all BetterRide Jr. Expert (Cat 1 podium)! Really impressed with riders hard work and commitment.

BetterRide Students

All BetterRide top 3 in Jr. Expert (the future pros) Galen Carter in first, Niko “Kill It” Kilik in second and Tyler Krenek in third!

 

 

BetterRide Mountain bike skills students

Pro Women podium students Adrienne Schneider in first and Joy Brinkerhoff in third

 

There is a great interview with five time BetterRide Camp veteran Mitch Ropelato on pinkbike, he talks about his career, his choice of using a 29er for many downhill races and there are some GREAT photos too! Read it here: http://www.pinkbike.com/news/29er-questions-mitch-ropelato-2014.html

And I got to ride and coach John Palmer again!  http://wp.me/p49ApH-13G

We love helping you reach your best and it is great to see you practicing instead of just riding! Keep up the great work!

Don’t just ride your bike, drive your bike,

Gene

 

mountain bike student cornering

65 Year Old Mountain Biker Killing It! BetterRide Students Have More Fun!

Although we are most famous for coaching World and National Champions* in our skills progressions we coach riders just like you too! In the same camps with those world champions! Here is a short video of a John Palmer, a 65 year old mountain biker and student who started riding bike when he was 59!

 

 

John proving that skills trump “balls”! We love helping riders like John improve just as much as the world champions. Anyone who learns to ride a bike at 59 and does steep descents like that at 65 is a World Champion in our book! Keep it up John!

 

*Mitch Ropelato, Ross Schnell, Sue Haywood, Jackie Harmony, Greg Minnaar, Marla Streb, Fred Schmid (photo below)

Mountain bike racer Fred

Fred was actually 81 at the Leadville 100 mountain bike race this year!

Fred is a two time World Masters Champion and finished the 2012 Leadville 100 in less than 12 hours when he was 80! Such a pleasure to coach inspiring riders like Fred and John!

Andy Cornering

Mountain Bike Better By Riding and Racing More? Advice from an Olympic Champion!

Can you Mountain bike better by riding and/or racing more? I sure thought so and it worked for a few years! I realize you might not have any competitive ambitions but bet you want to ride at your best. Wouldn’t you like to confidently ride the toughest trails in your area? In Whistler and Moab? This article is for all riders who would like to mountain bike better! Some Advice from an Olympic champion with way less riding and racing time than the competitors she beat!

Mountain Bike Better With Skills!

Mountain Bike Better With Skills!

When I first started mountain bike racing in 1993 I wanted to race every weekend as that is what everyone said would make me faster and better. It kind of worked, I turned pro two years later and I had gotten much faster. Then, the strangest thing happened, I felt like over my first three years in the pro class I barely improved, I hit a plateau despite riding and racing as much as I could. I realized one of the biggest things holding me back was cornering, no one entered corners faster than me but many racers exited a lot faster. So I asked more experienced, faster pro racers how to corner faster and they said things like, “let off the brakes you wuss!” which really didn’t help. There had to be an actual technique (like in ski racing and snowboard racing) but no one could teach me and after 10 years of riding at that point I had not managed to just stumble upon the technique. So in my first five years of riding my “skills” seemed to grow by leaps and bounds then just stopped growing in the next five years. This was frustrating!

I which I read this article, “The Secret of Mikaela Shiffrin’s Success: Always Practice, Never Compete” when I started riding:  http://www.slate.com/blogs/five_ring_circus/2014/02/21/mikaela_shiffrin_sochi_the_secret_to_the_18_year_old_s_success_was_to_practice.html So Mikaela’s advice is to practice more, not ride more!

Turns out, riding everyday does make you “better” at first then you quickly reach a plateau as you reach the limit of the habits you have developed. As stated in the books Outliers, The Talent Code, Talent is Over Rated and Mastery just doing something over and over again doesn’t make us better. What you need is deliberate practice! Deliberate practice is the opposite of going out and riding out in the wilderness, it is short, focused practice sections with a focus, making mistakes, figuring out why/what mistake you made, correcting it, practice with purpose. This is done in all sports by being coached in the proper, often non-intuitive skills and then doing drills to master those skills! So if  you want to ride at your best follow Mikaela advice, invest in solid coaching and practice your way to success. Then you will be able to confidently ride the toughest trails in your area, in Whistler and Moab!

Sure, Mikaela’s competitors probably had a lot more fun (and possibly more frustration) over the last few years but who is having more fun now?! Practice can be fun and confidently riding trails that once scared you is really fun!

Mountain bike myths

BetterRide Coach Chip assisting students in a cornering drill designed to ingrain the right habits.

Don’t make the mistake I made and ingrain bad habits when you could be creating new, correct, in balance and in control techniques! Start practicing more and riding trail just a little less and your quality of ride will greatly improve!