Mountain Bike Cockpit For Riders With Back Issues and/or Tight Hips

Mountain Bike Cockpit For Riders With Back Issues and/or Tight Hips

Most mountain bikers are tenacious but riders who refuse to quit or even start riding with major back issues like fused vertebrates, degenerative disk disease, bulging disks, etc. really inspire me! I was fortunate enough to coach just such a rider this weekend, Skeeter is a 57 year old mountain biker who has been riding dirt bikes for years and has degenerative disk disease. His cockpit set up is really tall which will compromise the bikes handling a bit but it is way better than not riding or riding a bike set up for performance that makes your back hurt.  A 58 year old woman with four fused vertebrae that I coached in a camp with us in 2003  had her bike set up similarly and I explained she might have to walk a few steep climbs (because it is nearly impossible on a steep hill to keep your weight centered with your bars 3-4 inches higher than your saddle) but those climbs are only a small fraction of her riding miles. At least she is out riding! The fact that she was starting to ride at 58 blew me away, she never had a bike as a kid even!

Here is Skeeter’s cockpit setup for his back issues:

Skeeter's Mountain Bike Cockpit For His Bad Back

Skeeter’s Mountain Bike Cockpit For His Bad Back

 

This will compromise the bikes handling a bit (because it is nearly impossible when climbing a steep hill to keep your weight centered with your bars 3-4 inches higher than your saddle and your bars will be too high descending putting you in a tall and upright position) but it is way better than not riding or riding a bike set up for performance that makes your back hurt worse. See these articles on body position for more on that: http://betterride.net/blog/2011/mtb-skills-tip-w-pic-technical-climbing-wandy-winohradsky/ and http://betterride.net/blog/2010/mountain-bike-desending-body-position-101-video-demonstration/

Great to see riders of all shapes, sizes and with various performance reducing injuries/conditions still out riding and having fun on the trail!

Mountain Bike Handlebar Height and Body Position

Coach Andy’s informative and detailed article on mountain bike handlebar height.

Hi there, this is Coach Andy W. and the following is an email response that I sent back to a confused/frustrated rider.  He was having some issues concerning the height of his handlebars and was also the victim of some bad bike-advice from arguably the most common source of bad bike-advice: a riding buddy!
Read more

The Final Say on Mountain Bike Wheel Size!

The Final Say on Mountain Bike Wheel Size! All you need to know about wheel sizes and what size is right for you.

All this might get you thinking about test riding a bike so read this article to get the most out of your test ride:

http://betterride.net/?p=2885

First ask yourself honestly how many mtbs you want at any given time. Can you afford one mountain bike, two bikes (a downhill bike and an xc bike), or three bikes, (a xc bike, an enduro/all mtn bike and a downhill bike), four bikes (a xc bike, an enduro/all mtn bike, a dirt jumper and a downhill bike) or five bikes, (a fat bike, xc bike, an enduro/all mtn bike, a dirt jumper and a downhill bike)? Sadly, a friend of mine owns all five of those bikes but he has never invested in is own riding so he rides all of those bikes not nearly as well as he could (slightly out of balance, slightly out of control, entering corners fast and coming out slow, etc.) so don’t be a fool and spend all your money on your bikes, spend some on you!

Then ask yourself what you want to do on each bike as your answer/s will differ greatly if you can afford multiple bikes.

How tall are you? Height is a big factor as you reach a point where 29r’s and even 650b/27.5 bikes will simply be too big (not necessarily too big to ride but too big to ride in control, in balance and efficiently)  if you are vertically challenged. Saying you are tall enough to ride a 29r is the same as saying I am tall enough to ride a 36r, which I am but just because I can do it doesn’t mean it is good. If you are below 5’5″ 29r’s start to become pretty cumbersome (I know people that are 5′ even and love their 29r but if they had a chance to spend a week on a 650 or even a 26r they would probably find the smaller wheeled bike more fun). If you are 4’10” or shorter 650b/27.5 bikes may be a bit cumbersome, definitely thoroughly test similar 27.5″ and 26″ bikes to figure out which fits you best.

If you want one bike that will do it all well you will want a 27.5 with 5″ of travel and a 66-68 degree head angle.

 

Norco 650b all mountain bike

Norco has imbraced the 650b wheel for most of their mtb line

If your over riding goal is to win xc races your will want a 29r, there is simply nothing quite as efficient a weapon for xc racing as a 29r.

Orbea 29r race bike

If you like all mountain riding and/or enduro racing you will want a 650b/27.5″ wheeled bike with 5-7″ of travel. The 27.5″ tires are the perfect compromise between the rolling ease of a 29r and maneuverability of a 26r. Most medium priced and above non-xc race mountain bikes will be 650b by 2015.

ibis 650 mountain bike

Ibis Mojo 650B is a good looking mountain bike!

Dirt Jumpers, slopestyle and 4 cross bikes will stay 26″ as other than possibly rolling a little faster there is no real benefit to bigger wheels for this style of riding (and one big downside, weaker, more flexy wheels). If this is the kind of bike you are looking for stick with 26″ wheels!

For downhill you will eventually want a 650b but until all the companies (especially fork companies) get the geometry dialed in you may end up waiting a year or two to get one.

 

KHS has their 650b DH machine dialed!

As for me, I have three mountain bikes a Canfield Jedi Downhill bike (26r), a 26″ wheeled dirt jumper and Specialized Evo 29r. I had been waiting for 68 degree head tube angle 29r for over a year and finally got the EVO this spring.  I have been riding the EVO all summer and though it is very efficient it isn’t fun to ride like my old 26r or the 650b bikes I have ridden (it goes straight great and is like cheating going up rock ledges and technical climbs but doesn’t like cornering and switchbacks. It is cumbersome, slow and awkward to throw around). The Evo 29r will be for sale soon and replaced with a 650b. The dirt jumper is great for pumptracks and jumping so it will stay! The Jedi will hopefully be replaced by a 650b wheeled DH bike from Canfield Brothers but that might not be until 2015.

 

Gene Hamilton Canfield Jedi Mountain Bike

My all-time favorite downhill bike, my Canfield Jedi!

MTB Tires Really Effect Your Ride, Control and Confidence!

Wow, I have posted on the importance of good tires before, but after a weekend on a rental bike with tires very similar to the ones used by many of our xc racing students I have to discuss this again! I had not been on tires like this in years so I forgot how bad they really are! Is lower rolling resistance worth losing 25-50% of your control? On fast, non-technical race courses it may be, but at the Jungle Habit and Ringwood, NJ trails this weekend it was not worth it.

These WTB Tires rolled fast but did not get much grip!

The small (in height and thickness) knobs provided little rolling resistance, but squirmed on rocks (because they flexed, a lot) and didn’t climb or corner well. I would only use these tires on a bike path (or maybe an easy xc race trail involving no skill).

If you are looking for a confidence inspiring tire that will hook up, study what the best downhill racers are using in your area and buy similar tires (if you are worried about weight get the single ply versions, if you hate flatting, like increased control and don’t mind extra weight (double the tire weight) use downhill, double ply tires.  Tall knobs work well on softer surfaces like the loomy trails in the Pacific Northwest and in mud. The more hard packed the surface (as in Colorado, Utah, Arizona and much of California) a medium to low height knob with a lot of surface area (blocky knobs instead of skinny knobs) as these tires will put more rubber on the ground (as the surface is too hard for the knobs to push into the ground) and the big surface area keeps the knobs from flexing (flexing makes the tires squirm). My personal favorite tire for Colorado, Utah, Arizona and California is the Maxxis High Roller.

 

The High Roller!

Notice how thick the knobs are! These tires are also Greg Minnaar’s favorite tires. Greg says that they roll fast for an aggressive tire and they are very predictable. Specialized, Kenda and Schwalbe all make excellent tires, do your research and find the ones made for your trail conditions.

Tires also come in different rubber hardness, the harder the rubber the faster they roll and the longer they last. The softer the rubber the better traction they have but they roll slower and where quicker. Many manufacturers offer dual and triple compound tires where the center, rolling knobs that get the most wear are a harder compound than the cornering knobs (which get less use but are vital to cornering control). Tire hardness is measured in Durometer, the higher the number the harder the rubber. Most tires range in Durometer from 42 to 70. 70 durometer tires feel almost like plastic and slide easily, but roll fast. 42 durometer tires are favored by downhill racers but wear really quickly and roll slow, most tires will fall in between. Better, more expensive tires often will have a dual compound of around 55 for the center knobs and 45 for the side. Dual and triple compound tires are my favorite for xc use as they hook up almost as well as a downhill tire, but roll a little faster and last longer.

Tire pressure also greatly effects your ride. Lower pressure hooks up better, smooths out the trail a bit and rolls faster than higher pressure so go lower. For more info on tires check out my older post on this: