Another Upgrade That Can Help Your MTB Riding!

An upgrade that can help your mtb riding!

I had a fellow mountain biker email me a great question the other day.

“I do have one question. I’m wondering what your opinion is on the importance of a really good rear hub. I tried to find something on the web page but I couldn’t. Personally I find that a quality rear hub is one of the best improvements you can make on a Mtn bike. It might be because I ride trials but I fell there is a huge difference between instant engagement and near instant engagement, weather climbing or descending. I was just curious what your opinion might be. I don’t often get to ask questions of bike experts..

Thanks again,

Jim Loughlin”

The exact Chris King Hub I run

The answer is, yes in many situations.

When climbing a technical climb with lots of rocks and ledges the near instant engagement makes timing of pedal wheelies and weight shifts much easier and precise. These hubs eliminate the “dead spot” when you pedal 10-20 degrees with no engagement. This dead spot can cause your weight to move forward before your bike moves forward often shifting you out of position. Better engagement also allows you to keep your feet more level when ratchet pedaling, requiring less downward movement to achieve the same amount of forward progress.

Even while descending the quick engagement allows you to apply power to the pedals a hair quicker coming out of corners. This leads to a feeling of being more precise and in control.

Hadley Rear Hub

Here is a list of some hubs with quicker engagement and number of points of engagement (I am skills coach not a bike part nerd, I am sure there are quite a few I am leaving out) XT 36pt., DT Swiss 36pt, Hadley 72pt, Chris King 72 pt, Industry 9 120pt, Halo Supa Drive 120pt. For me it feels like the Hadley and Chris King work great with 72 points of engagement which I believe is every 6 degrees and the Industry 9 and Halo are about every 3 degrees. There is also a newer company, Stealth Hubs that claim less than a degree of rotation for engagement but I haven’t heard much about them (which only means I can’t give you my opinion on them). Do your research and find the hubs you like and that fit your budget, some of these hubs cost almost as much as our three day skills progressions!

Personally I am a big fan of both Chris King and Hadley Hubs. I have a Hadley rear Hub on my practice wheel set and it has lasted six years so far. My race wheelset has Chris King hubs and they have lasted two seasons so far and still work great.

 

Mountain Biking Off-Season Fun!

As I write this, it’s late November out there. For most of us, riding-wise, we’re in some version of the “off-season”. While there are many important things that we can be doing in the off-season to get us prepared to go-for-it when the new riding season ramps up (which I’ll go into in future articles), a lot off us probably could use some much deserved time away from the bike.

If you’re a serious rider, this may mean that physically, you can use a little break. But, I feel that the mental break we get from riding during this time, is just as – if not more – important then the physical. Its very easy to get wrapped up in race results, training programs, fitness goals – or maybe just the stress of beating yourself up for missing those rides you promised yourself you’d do — losing the battle of time-juggling to real-life.

So, in this “skills article”, I’m going to give you a break. This is an easy one (and if it isn’t, then maybe we have problems!).

Take a deep breath and look back on this past year, and think about all the FUN you had on your bike.

We all had some great rides, some great days. We all had many “victories” whether that means a victory on a results sheet, or a personal goal accomplished with no one to witness but the trees and the rocks (often the best victories). You probably met some cool and interesting people out there on the trails. Maybe you made some new friends, or maybe you’ll never see that person again in your entire life, but because of that quick exchange, for whatever reason, you’ll remember them. Maybe you traveled and rode new places. No matter your skill level, there was a time when you felt like an animal out there (man, I’m killin’ it today!). Maybe you had the world’s most horribly-crappy day at work, or whatever, and then you were able to squeak a ride in and, next thing you know, your day wasn’t so bad … then decent … then, all of a sudden, you were laughing at yourself for letting all that meaningless BS get you bummed in the first place (Bike Therapy).

The list goes on and on. But we ride these things ‘cause it’s fun. It’s exciting. It’s exhilarating… and sometimes we forget about that.

The following photos are from phenomenal photographer, Joshua Duplechian. Check out more of his stuff – and not just bikes – at: www.joshuaduplechian.com

Josh tagged along on one of the fairly regular, early-am-Friday-rides, that a bunch of us buddies managed to (usually) squeeze in before work (or before running damage control and catch-up-on-your-life after traveling and teaching bike camps for three-or-so weeks).

This was a perfect fall morning, just a few days before the first snow of the season. Nothing special, but still … one of those great rides … enjoy.

Andy Descending

Bike “Industy Experts” Sometimes Give Poor Advice!

This is Andy’s take on something that is plaguing mountain biking, bad advice by self appointed experts.

Ok, this may seem a bit harsh, but I’m ready to go to war with ignorant, “industry experts” such as bike shop employees, shop owners, especially “professional bike fitters”, (AND husbands and boyfriends of female students who “…know what’s best for my girl’ ‘cause I’ve been riding for twenty years and use to race!” – I love that one!) that refuse to wake up, educate themselves, and understand what equipment is necessary in order to most effectively ride an MTB — both up and down an incline — in technically challenging terrain and therefore, continue to give riders advice and recommendations on equipment that are just plain wrong.

If you’re a normal-joe, just trying to help out with advice, “well, this is what I use…” or “I heard this works really well…” then, hey, I understand. You’re just trying to help another rider out. (Maybe, throw in a, “I’m no expert, but…” first?). But, it’s the people whose job it is to be an expert on the topic — whom other riders should be able to trust — who are too lazy, close-minded, and/or egotistical (or stocked their shop with the wrong stuff) to figure out what is going on in the bike world (not just right out your front door, on your local trail…got news for you: that’s not ‘the bike world!’) and therefore, not only won’t sell riders what they need in order to ride their bikes more effectively, but bad mouth the equipment and the “True Experts” (ahem…us) that recommend it… those are the ones I’m after!

After every camp I teach, I get emails form students, where the above is the case.

ALMOST every rider that buys a stock MTB, — assuming that their goal is to have the best all-around handling bike (which is the goal of the instruction in our camps – and to be the best all-around rider you can be) — can benefit from wider bars, a shorter stem, and an adjustable height seat post. Control set up, proper tire selection, pedal/shoe combination, a frame with adequate angels… all these things matter, also.

This obviously is not the “bike set-up” portion of a BetterRide Camp, we’re not sitting here discussing things real-time. So, I can’t hit every detail and explanation in this article. However, the following is an email response that I sent to a student that maybe can set a few “experts” straight. If a lot of this stuff is completely foreign to you, get on the ol’ internet and check it out!

Andy Descending

Hey —-,

Sorry to hear about the “opinions” of your local shop owner. Here’s something to consider with bike set up:

Again, we need to know what the goal of our riding is, and what terrain we want to excel on, and set our bikes up accordingly. If I’m racing the Leadville 100 (100 mi’s of dirt road–nothing too technical), or a typical XC race (not very technical, usually not technical at all), then I’m NOT going to use the bike I currently have, which is set up for aggressive trail riding.

However, if I’m riding fun, technically challenging, “expert level” trails, then my current bike set up is exactly what I want. Most campers come to our camp to learn how to ride the latter, and that’s what we focus on with bike set up. And if you can learn to ride this type of riding, and obtain some skills, it will definitely help everywhere else.

I would say that the closest type of MTB racing to the type of riding that I’m talking about above is “super-d” or “enduro” racing (not ENDURANCE racing–different stuff). These are fairly long, primarily downhill races, but also have climbs, flat pedal-y sections, etc. Sometimes, these are multi-day, multi-stage races where as soon as riders finish a stage they immediately have to climb, on trail, to the top of the next course and get there in an allocated amount of time for the next stage. So: fast difficult, technically challenging downhill descents, and large amounts of climbing, sometimes over a few days. You get to use one bike, and, often, your bike is photographed and marked so that you can’t change (most) of the parts.

The idea is that the winner is an all around mountain biker. Endurance, technical skill, proper equipment (a bike that can handle the descents AND climb back to the top–quickly!) is mandatory! True Mountain Biking!

Sound familiar? This is basically what we teach. My bike at the camp is my super-d race bike with few very minor changes. This is the largest growing type of racing because it involves much of why many people ride MTB: scare the shit out of yourself/handle it/have a blast on the way down, but also be fit enough and able enough to crush your competition on the climb. (The races and courses are also kind of unpredictable, forcing riders to be able to adapt — in the true nature of MTB!)

The reason I bring up this type of racing is because — as I said — it is essentially what we teach, and if you look at all the top riders in this type of discipline, their bikes will almost always be set up almost exactly like mine/what we emphasized in camp: the best all-around handling mountain bike you can put together. And, racing isn’t about fashion or what’s cool (when it really comes down to it). It’s about function. As they say, “the clock doesn’t lie”.

Again, I know super-d racing isn’t the goal for all of us, but being a great all around rider is the focus of the camp so that’s also what we focus on with the bike.

DIRT magazine had a feature on a lot of pro bike set ups for this type of racing a couple months ago. Some of these races: Downeville Classic in California, Oregon Super-d Series, Some of the Mega-avalanche stuff in Europe…

And, like I said in camp, a bike-fitter won’t help you out with this, in fact, they’ll take you in the wrong direction. (ask M— how his bike fitter would do a fit on a downhill bike. Downhilling is a big part of the equation, right?)

Unfortunately, M—, like so many other shop owners or “industry experts”, is a bit behind the times…

Andy

In racing, riders use what works. A BetterRide bike is set up to be the best all-around handling bike possible. This type of racing is proof of that set up.

… and, please, don’t tell me that I can’t fit through trees with my wide bars. Take a camp, and we’ll show you how to do that, too.

Gene’s Article on on bar width and stem length: http://betterride.net/?p=486

Gene’s Article on dropper seat posts: http://betterride.net/?p=625

Gene’s Article on tires and tire pressure: http://betterride.net/blog/2010/another-thing-you-can-buy-and-instantly-have-more-bike-control/