BetterRiders on the Podium at the Canadian National Champs Too!

Another cool email from the father of a happy camper:
“Hi Gene,
Just read your newsletter; sounds like you took the “scenic line” down the National Champs course 🙂  Bummer.

14 year old McKay in 3 Place in U 17 at the Canadian National Champs

I thought i’d add to your list of students on the podium at National Championships.  Mckay (he attended your Bootleg camp with Greg M.) finished 3rd in U17 Expert Men at the Canadian DH Nationals (as a 14 yr old).  2 weeks prior, he raced at the PRO GRT at Northstar, where he finished 3rd in Cat 2 Men 18 and Under (and re-connected with Greg Minnaar, who introduced him to Steve Peat; pretty exciting stuff for a young racer!), so he had a really good two weeks!
best of luck at your race this fall in South America, and we look forward to seeing you at a camp in the future.
Sincerely,
Chris Vezina.

What good are skills if you can’t use them under pressure?

I just received this email from a student:  “Hi Gene,
I’ve really started to feel the effects of your camp and my technique has got a hell of a lot better, when I’m racing i feel so confident and fast in practice

But then when it gets to seeding and race runs this all goes out of the window and i just end up falling off, I’m not riding outside of my limits and i know that i can ride well enough to be threatening the top spot in my category but i just seem to not be able to manage the pressure and the mental side of things.

Any tips on race mentality etc??”

This a tough thing for many racers and as I mentioned a few times in
my camp, what good are all the skills if you can’t use them when
needed?

You need to toughen up your mental game. First, remember there is
no difference between a race and a practice run, same track, same
racer, same bike, same goal.  The only difference between your race
run and a practice run is the pressure YOU but on the run. Treat your
race rub=n as another practice run (especially if you are doing timed
practice runs using a stopwatch)  then read these two blog posts:
http://betterride.net/blog/2010/are-you-tough-part-1/ and
http://betterride.net/blog/2010/are-you-tough-part-2/ and most
importantly ready, study, practice, master one of these books from
your homework assignment:

The New Toughness Training for Sports: Mental, Emotional, and Physical
Conditioning from One of the World’s Premier Sports Psychologists
by James E. Leohr, Chris Evert, Dan Jansen,

Excellent book with work sheets to help you practice what it teaches.

The Mental Edge: Maximize Your Sports Potential with the Mind/Body Connection
by Ken Baum, Richard Trubo,

Excellent book with work sheets to help you practice what it teaches.

Body Mind Mastery: Creating Success in Sport and Life
by Dan Millman,

Really, really great book that goes a little deeper into why you
compete in sports and helps you integrate sport and life (helps you
see and create balance in your life so the sport does not take over
your life).

Most importantly have fun!  That’s what keeps Steve Peat and Minnaar on top.

Railing Corners, maintaining body position while braking for corner.

Interesting braking and cornering question asked by one of my students:

“Just a quick follow up question.  I have been having a problem getting out of position before cornering, primarily caused by hard braking (especially if there are rough terrain before the corner or if I come in too hot).  As I brake, my body gets behind the center and lower as well, and by the time I start entering the corner, I am out of the “attack” position.  My front wheel feels light, and it becomes difficult to get in the correct cornering body position.

If you have suggestions as to how to properly transition from braking into cornering (especially under hard braking), I would appreciate it.”

Interesting question, I have been working on the same issue, especially last weekend at Snowmass. The problem stems from getting back while we brake, getting low is good but we need to stay more centered so when we release the brakes and the bike accelerates we are centered and ready to attack the corner.  I was taught the old school, “get way back while you brake” which does help the rear brake a bit but actually hurts the effectiveness of the much more powerful front brake.  Getting back also puts me out of balance and makes it hard to corner correctly.  My entire focus at the last two races has been to stay centered as I brake, use A LOT of front brake and then let off and attack the corner. Believe me, the entrances to these corners are really rough and brake bumped, but you can still stay centered. When working with Greg Minnaar he really stresses this. It sounds scary but once you do it you realize two things: 1. you can brake in a much shorter distance with more control (less front wheel slide) 2. you are in a much better position to corner when you let off the brakes. This is another reason to practice the braking drills from the camp you took.

As always it comes down to doing drills to master skills then practicing with purpose and a focus on quality!

Create a railed corner (or two)!

Great Review from one of Don’s students in Park City

Great to hear about my certified coaches doing an awesome job. This is an email from one of Don Bogardus’s  students:

Gene,

The clinics were awesome!  Everything made sense, implements well and I left a better rider.  I am continuing to work on the skills daily and seeing results.  Don said you are coming to Park City in July and that I could bump up my riding even further with a lesson from you.  Do you have any time to work with me?  If so, what is your going rate?  I could not be happier with the results so far and would love to see where this might take me.
Thanks so much, cause I am having so much fun on the trail with what I have learned from your clinics,

Ric

Find more reviews here: http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/UMBphpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=7427