Railing Corners, maintaining body position while braking for corner.

Interesting braking and cornering question asked by one of my students:

“Just a quick follow up question.  I have been having a problem getting out of position before cornering, primarily caused by hard braking (especially if there are rough terrain before the corner or if I come in too hot).  As I brake, my body gets behind the center and lower as well, and by the time I start entering the corner, I am out of the “attack” position.  My front wheel feels light, and it becomes difficult to get in the correct cornering body position.

If you have suggestions as to how to properly transition from braking into cornering (especially under hard braking), I would appreciate it.”

Interesting question, I have been working on the same issue, especially last weekend at Snowmass. The problem stems from getting back while we brake, getting low is good but we need to stay more centered so when we release the brakes and the bike accelerates we are centered and ready to attack the corner.  I was taught the old school, “get way back while you brake” which does help the rear brake a bit but actually hurts the effectiveness of the much more powerful front brake.  Getting back also puts me out of balance and makes it hard to corner correctly.  My entire focus at the last two races has been to stay centered as I brake, use A LOT of front brake and then let off and attack the corner. Believe me, the entrances to these corners are really rough and brake bumped, but you can still stay centered. When working with Greg Minnaar he really stresses this. It sounds scary but once you do it you realize two things: 1. you can brake in a much shorter distance with more control (less front wheel slide) 2. you are in a much better position to corner when you let off the brakes. This is another reason to practice the braking drills from the camp you took.

As always it comes down to doing drills to master skills then practicing with purpose and a focus on quality!

Create a railed corner (or two)!

Great Review from one of Don’s students in Park City

Great to hear about my certified coaches doing an awesome job. This is an email from one of Don Bogardus’s  students:

Gene,

The clinics were awesome!  Everything made sense, implements well and I left a better rider.  I am continuing to work on the skills daily and seeing results.  Don said you are coming to Park City in July and that I could bump up my riding even further with a lesson from you.  Do you have any time to work with me?  If so, what is your going rate?  I could not be happier with the results so far and would love to see where this might take me.
Thanks so much, cause I am having so much fun on the trail with what I have learned from your clinics,

Ric

Find more reviews here: http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/UMBphpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=7427

Wow, more excited emails from students, then one about a blog post.

This blog post (the  number 1 thing holding you back post) could not have come at a better time! And it is so true. XC Ontario Cup #3 is on May 30 and I’ve been stressing myself out since my first preride on the weekend by telling myself that I’m not good enough to do this race. The race is combined as a Canada Cup race – so it is a lot harder than I’m used to for an Ontario Cup. I have one really weak skill in XC – log overs on a steepish climb (or on any climb depending how big the log/roots bit is). And the course is just littered with them. Steep climbs with big roots/logs. Even logs on flat ground trouble me if they are big enough (and there’s a few biggies on the course!). I constantly smack my cranks against them or have no momentum because I’m scared if I go faster, I’ll just crash harder (happened a few times before).  I spin out, stall without the momentum I need, or I just put my foot down in defeat. And to add to it – the Canada Cup start time schedule is different – so now the Senior Sport Men are in our start time too instead of later in the day. I’ve never had a pack of those fast guys on the course at the same time as me before! Combined with all the tough spots on the course…well….I’ve been telling myself all week that I can’t do this race. That I’m not good enough for a Canada Cup.

My Elite racing friend took me on a preride of the course and watched me conquer similar sections and spin out/stop on other sections. He gave me some advice on body positioning and technique but told me that my problem wasn’t the skill, it was psychological. I’m so used to telling myself that I can’t do it, that I’ve spent so much time NOT doing it. I went to the local forest yesterday for a 3 hour enduro ride where I started from scratch on the skill and worked my way up bigger and bigger logs/roots-on-hills. I can lift my front wheel better and I can now get up and over things I wasn’t getting before. It’s a start. But your blog really hit home this week! I do admit I am still nervous like heck for the race on Sunday and I’m still battling the voice of the mind!
More than my fitness or anything else! It really is true …”Fear is the mind killer” -Dune.

Thanks Gene!

Cheers
Laura

Check out this email! Andy Loves His Job Too!

It is emails like this that make me love what I do.  It feels great to have past down my coaching techniques to one of my long time riding buddies (and racing nemesis! Andy is faster and smoother than me).
Gene,
I’m still “coming down” from the excitement of attending your mountain bike skills camp. Exciting because I have been “winging it” on a mountain bike for the last 20 years. There are no more “gray areas”, it’s now black and white. I will be practicing and implementing the skills that I learned, for the rest of my mountain bike life.
I’m sure that you have heard this before, your head coach Andy W. is perfect. Besides his obvious experience he has the natural ability to pass on the essential material. His instruction was polished combined with his people skills and communication skills. When it comes to constructive criticism, I can’t think of anything that could have been improved on and have nothing to add.
This was a priceless experience that I will never forget.  I’m amazed at how much better of a rider I have already become. With your skills that I learned, I definitely accomplished my goal to become a better and safer mountain bike rider.
The camp location was a 8 hr. drive for me and well worth it.  For people that you have that might be “on the fence” about attending one of your camps, tell them that no matter what it takes (time and money), attend a skills camp ASAP. It will pay dividends every time they get on the bike.

Thanks, Rich Schmit.