Stop being one with your bike!

Stop Being One With Your Bike! (Mountain Bike Better Today.)

Stop Being One With Your Bike! Mountain Bike Better Today.

The most common mistake I see riders making is being one with their bikes. You don’t want to do what your bike is doing! Ever get “eyeball jiggle” (when your eyes are bouncing and you can’t focus on the trail)? Ever feel like the trail is bucking you or that you handlebars are being yanked out of your hands? These are all symptoms of being one with your bike. Mentally you may want to be one with your bike but not physically! Watch a skilled rider go through a rough section of trail, their bike is all over the place (wheels bouncing, rear end kicking up, frame jerking up, down and sideways) but their chest and head are barely moving! This is because they are letting the bike move beneath them, being “separate” from their bike.

What causes you to be one with your bike (other than bad advice)? Fear, your instinct to move away from danger, riding above your skill level (riding a trail you are not confident to ride or riding faster than you are comfortable), lack of knowledge of proper body position (or knowledge of proper body position but not using proper body position because you haven’t ingrained proper body position with deliberate practice) all lead to being stiff and one with your bike. This leads to locked arms, stiff legs, possibly squeezing the seat with your thighs and bouncing all over the trail.

How do you fix this? Relax! Muscle tension causes your body to be stiff making it hard to absorb shock and let the bike move beneath you. The best mountain bike suspension ever made is your body! Your legs and arms have way more than 8” of suspension travel and that travel is instantaneous and well dampened (no need to adjust compression or rebound). So relax and use your body! How do you relax? Smile, smiling releases endorphins which relax us! Ride with a loose grip on the bars, death griping the bars effectively locks your arms with muscle tension (muscle tension also robs you of energy). Ride trails you can confidently ride! Riding trails that scare you will not make you better! Scary trails will make you feel less confident and lucky, when not confident you resort to survival instincts (like braking in a corner when going to fast or straightening out your arms while shifting your weight back when scared), not proper skills. Here is a photo of Ned, one of our students “driving his bike past a rider relying on instincts and being “one with his bike”. Notice how Ned is separate from his bike, centered and neutral.

Stop being one with your bike! Mountain bike better today

Ned “driving” his bike, separated, balanced and ready for what ever the trail throws at him.

Next, bend those elbows and knees to put you in a neutral position. Suspension has “sag” for a reason, your fork and rear suspension (if you have suspension) move both up and down to keep your wheels on the ground. You need to do the same! With straight arms and legs you can absorb upward forces but you will get yanked down small ledges as you “plop” down instead of gently rolling down. An excellent way to feel this and a drill to help ingrain this is: Find a set of stairs that you can comfortably roll down (not scary to you!). Roll down those stair with your arms straight, squeezing the seat your thighs while death griping the bars. Then roll down those stairs a second time smiling with your knees bent, elbows bent into a half push up position, knees bent, a loose grip on the bars and a lowered seat. You will be amazed at the difference! Once you feel how much better it is to be relaxed and supple practice this on stairs, rock ledges, bumpy sections of trail, etc. Really focus on one aspect of this (loose grip or knees bent or smiling or elbows bent, etc.) and practice until you can’t get it wrong! Remember, “Amateurs practice until they get it right, pros practice until they can’t get it wrong! Here is a great shot of Austin with knees and elbows bent, separate from his bike and completely in control!

Stop being one with your bike!

BetterRide student Austin Gooder riding with great form in Downeville

For more on body position and video showing both poor, “one with your bike” position and good separate from your bike position check out this blog post: http://betterride.net/blog/2010/mountain-bike-desending-body-position-101-video-demonstration/

I hope this has helped. Now put down your computer and go practice!

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