Mountain Bike Injury Recovery Kit

While I much prefer writing about all of the positives of mountain biking an unfortunate thing about riding is injury, it will happen. As a mountain biker, snowboarder, skateboarder, dirt biker, cinder block and scrap wood ramp Evel Knievel imitator and BMXer I have had my share of injuries. Now, I’m injured again! I wish had some cool story how I was racing Steve Peat down a World Cup race track but I was actually going pretty slow and just got off balance a bit. Going 1-2 miles an hour in a rocky downhill switchback after rolling through a snow patch my front wheel slid left and I chest planted to the right, (right on to a cinder block sized rock) breaking four ribs and fracturing a vertebrae. Scary to get hurt that bad going so slow! This is a mountain bike injury recovery kit, not to be confused with a first aid kit. This kit is for when you wounds have been treated and you get home from the emergency room. I unfortunately had none of the items in this kit and would of been much better off if I had had them when I got home. Traumatic injuries do a lot more than break bones and often the treatments are almost as painful as the injuries. The first thing I wanted after being in the most pain of my life for 3-4 hours was something to kill the pain! They finally gave me an IV of something they said was 7 times more powerful than Morphine. It took my pain from off the charts down to a manageable 4 or 5 (on a scale of 1-10) but unfortunately it had one big side effect, nausea! As with the last time I visited the emergency room the second I was released I was wishing for more pain and less nausea. I threw up five times on the way to Dante and Jackie’s house and four more times on the way to get my prescription filled. Not fun with four broken ribs and pretty messy in Jackie and Dante’s van! By the time I got back to my house the next day I was feeling surprisingly good for a guy who slept for only a few hours while sitting up the night before. After a few hours getting a fair amount of work done the pain came back and I took my first Percocet. This was a big mistake as it created both nausea and gas (I felt like I was going to explode! the worst stomach pain of my life). Thanks to the help of two loving friends I made it through a pretty terrible night but would not wish that pain on anyone. Now to the kit that could of saved a lot of pain. My new Mountain Bike Injury Recovery Kit contains: Gas-X (to keep the bloating down!) Laxatives and stool softeners, there are many great home remedies to but you still need the ingredients.  (Pain killers block you up and many injuries make going poo even more painful.) A neck pillow (8 days later I am still sleeping sitting up, this really helps my neck!) Dramamine (I haven’t tried this yet but should help with the nausea) A Tens 3000 electro stem device (great pain relief) A Netflix subscription! Also, if you, like me often ride without your wallet it would be a good idea to at least have your id and insurance card on you when you ride, especially if you ride alone. Having my id would of saved me the final four bouts of barfing and would have gotten me to bed an hour earlier.

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30 replies
  1. Steve says:

    May your recovery be smooth and complete. My heart goes out to you. I had the same issues after a painful surgery. Great tips for a recovery kit.

    Reply
  2. Stephen Kavalin says:

    Zofran my brother. Also take the cap off a bottle of rubbing alcohol and smell the alcohol fumes for 10-20 minutes. Even more powerful than Zofran in relieving nausea

    Reply
  3. Damian says:

    Ouch, that sucks Gene!

    I’ve broken my collarbone three times and have found that a daily dose of 1/2 cup of wheat bran in a smoothie works well for me. Then again, I’m sure you’ve been in this place often enough to have worked out your own routine.

    Good luck healing up! Can’t wait for the book to be done!

    Reply
  4. John W says:

    I’m wondering how you got down off the mountain in that condition??? Speedy recovery Gene, and give your stationary bike a hug!

    Reply
    • Gene says:

      Thanks John!

      After passing out from getting the wind knocked out of me (and really scaring my riding companions) I slowly made it to my feet (over probably 10-20 minutes, sitting there in pain and shock thinking I might of punctured or collapsed a lung) and with little tiny steps I walked out (with some assistance at first). I am a bit of a control freak and the idea of waiting over an hour for a long, painful stretcher ride out scared me. Every little step I took calmed me down and made me feel a little less helpless and more in control. At one point my arms and legs got really tingly and started going numb so I had my friends call the Ranger Station (really close to where the trail popped out on the road), they arrived right as I was made it to the road. Luckily we were probably a little less than a mile from the main road. Probably the slowest walk ever down that trail.

      Looking back at it I am so glad I choose to walk out as I still can’t lie down (without a massive amount of pain).

      Reply
  5. Mark says:

    I feel your pain, hope you heal fast and get back in the saddle soon. I just had my own bout with pain on Monday when I release a locking pin on a 20 ft ladder and is slid down and smashed my big toe. I don’t think it is broken but I had to burn a hole in my nail to releive the blood pressure from the swelling because my nail was about to blow off. I am sure it will come off anyways shorlty. Actually most of the pain is now coming from the frostbite I invflicted on the end of my toe with the ice pack. Advil was enough to pull me through the initial pain, no barbituates needed. But no riding untill who knows how long. Injuries suck and it seems like most of them happen when you are riding slow!! Speed is your friend.

    Reply
    • Gene says:

      Ouch Mark! Broken toes are the worst! Can’t walk or ride without an amazing amount of pain but you are 99.9% fine. Such a frustrating and painful injury. Heal fast and hopefully we will both be riding again soon!

      Reply
  6. Dave says:

    Hope you are back on the bike soon. I had pelvic, sacral, and rib fractures last year after a (higher speed) wreck, so I can relate. After a few days, the pain meds are much worse than the pain.

    Reply
    • Gene says:

      Ouch Dave, that sounds more painful than my injury. Right on about the pain meds, they screw up your insides and your brain.

      Reply
  7. Tom says:

    I am knocking on wood – I’ve not been through the trauma you have recently sustained. We’re thinking of you and wishing you a speedy and reduced pain recovery. Is there a future article being contemplated about getting back on the horse that threw you?

    Reply
    • Gene says:

      Thanks Tom! Great idea for an article, I have had to get back on that horse so many times in my life I am a master of it. Look for it in Early January.

      Reply
  8. Dorsey says:

    Hey Gene,
    Hope you’re feeling better fast. I just broke my collarbone pretty well on a jump landing gone bad. I’m into my second titanium plate with 9 screws. The pain is much better (4 weeks since surgery). Hope you get some good sleep soon and feel better!
    Dorsey

    Reply
  9. Rob Miller says:

    Gene,
    I am sorry to hear about your injury. As you stated it is a reality for all that enjoy and are active in sports. I dislocated my shoulder doing an endo off a log back in March of this year. I tried to rush my recovery and could have made things much worse than they were. Take the time to heal and do whatever therapy your doctor prescribes. I tried to ride 6 weeks after it happened.DUMB, DUMB AND DUMB. Once I started using the resistance bands and stretching like I should have done from the beginning, the healing really started. I am now back to my normal abnormal self , a little more cautious but a lot wiser.
    Take Care Gene,
    Rob

    Reply
  10. John Urkuski says:

    Thanks for sharing your experience and wishing you a speedy recovery! Also know you are not alone! I reckon everyone whom has ever thrown a leg over a two-wheeled all terrain bike has felt the agony of a misstep!
    Be Well and Heal!

    Reply
  11. Vicki Blyth says:

    Gene
    So sorry to hear about your crash and bad injuries. Wishing you a speedy recovery!

    Vicki

    Reply
  12. Scott Crabill says:

    Hey Gene,

    Sorry about your unfortunate get off, but glad you are on the mend. Good luck trying not to cough, sneeze or laugh for the next few weeks. Been there.

    Scott

    Reply
    • Gene says:

      Thanks Scott. Unfortunate to say the least, I don’t even have a cool story, although I have told a few people it was a rodeo accident!

      Reply
  13. Joe Cetola says:

    Sorry to hear about your injury Gene, it sucks getting injured. I’m the person that couldn’t make it to your camp in PA., was out in Mountain Creek Park, NJ Oct 6th, and rode over a large rock and missed the transition, Bang, fractured shoulder socket, scapula and 2 ribs. But we learn something from our mistakes. Well I learned that day how to float the bike underneath me, proper balance i guess. I had no use of the right arm and didn’t want to walk up and download (embarrassing) so I rode the trail out and realized how sweet it was to let the bike do it’s thing. It felt great. Well you will heal and in a few months be 102%. Also I found that sleeping on the fractured ribs actually felt comfortable. See you at camp soon!

    Reply
    • Gene says:

      Hi Joe,

      Wow, that sounds a lot worse than my injuries, hopefully you are 100% healed now. Yes, always learn from your mistakes!

      Cheers,

      Gene

      Reply

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