Did You Set an Intention For Your Ride?

What is your Intention?

As you know, (if you have taken a BetterRide camp) we always tell our mtb students to ride with a purpose; “I am going to work on braking before the turns.” “I am going to focus on keeping my weight on the pedals.”  Well, I just realized that these purposes are sub-goals or process goals (smaller goals we use to reach big goals). I still recommend that you ride with a purpose, but recently in a yoga class I learned a more powerful tool for improving your riding!

I’m not very good at yoga (though I’m getting much better with practice) and don’t love it the way I love mountain biking, I do it mostly because I know it helps me mountain bike, snowboard and surf better. Yoga has taught me a lot of lessons though and I apply those lessons when doing sports. In yoga classes the instructor will often ask each student to set their intention for the class. The instructor wants each student to set a big goal, such as staying in the moment or finding inner peace, what they will gain/takeaway from the class. This allows the student to get more out of each class and definitely helps me. Yesterday, while surfing I found having an intention helps in sports too. I caught the best wave of my life thanks to setting an intention!

The toughest parts of surfing for me are actually catching the darn wave and then standing up in good body position. With my snowboard background I am actually a decent surfer if I manage to catch a wave and stand up. So my purpose is usually either, “catch the wave” or “pop up”. Well, yesterday the waves were perfect for learning and I caught more waves and popped up more than ever before, but my rides were short and uninspiring. The tide was going out and the reef was getting dangerously shallow so my coach said, “Gene, this will be your last wave so ride it as far as you can.” Bam! I had an intention, ride my wave as far as I can. So I paddled hard, caught the wave, popped up and had the best ride of my life!

 

My Cousin Michael Dropping in at G-Land

As I was walking back on the beach I realized why my previous waves were so short, I had exceeded my purpose/s! Since I struggle so much with catching the wave and popping up I had no plan for what to do after I popped up. My intention gave me a clear plan, “ride as far as you can”. To do this I had to use a lot of skills or specific “purposes” I have worked on since my first surf camp; looking ahead, staying relaxed, bending my knees, etc. It was my intention that allowed me to access all of these skills, as I had to use all of them to ride that wave so far. Having that intention also allowed me to forget about the two purposes I had spent the last days focusing on (catching the wave and popping up) since my intention was the longest ride possible catching the wave and popping were givens! I wasn’t worried about either, allowing me to just do them!

How does this apply to you as a mountain biker? We need to understand the difference between an intention and a purpose and sometimes have a purpose and other times focus on your intention. I didn’t see the difference between the two before. “Riding as smooth as I can” is a great example, I used to tell students that this is a great purpose yet in reality it is an intention. Riding as smooth as you can requires a lot of separate skills or purposes, relaxed grip on the bars, weight on the pedals, elbows up and out, chest down, chin up, relaxed ankles, looking ahead and working with the trail. When you set the intention of being as smooth as you can be you will do all the skills required to be smooth. If you find you aren’t riding smoothly, you can analyze why (“darn, I’ve got the death grip on my bars”) and set a purpose to help you reach your intention, (my purpose is to relax my grip so I can be smoother). Setting your intention allows you to focus on the big picture, what do I want to get out of this ride? While having a purpose focuses us on a small piece of the big picture.  So, when you are not working on a specific skill, set an intention for your ride!

Some great intentions for mountain bikers:

- I am going to ride as smooth as I can.

- I am going be in the moment.

- Today I’m going to just relax and have fun on my bike.

- I’m going to be as efficient as I can be.

- I’m going to ride as fast as I can. *This one is tricky! Often this focus can make us tense and we start trying too hard. If this is your focus, time the ride and compare the time to being smooth on the same course, you might find being smooth is faster!

- I’m going to let go of all the tension in my body.

- I’m going to let go of all the tension in my mind.

- I’m going to take my time to stop and appreciate this beautiful day/trail/mountain/view etc.

Set your own intentions and let us know about the ones that really had a positive impact on your riding. This really, really helps you focus and improve your mental game on the bike!

 

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5 replies
  1. Philip Madeley says:

    Excellent. I have bee focusing on different aspects every time I ride (braking less, attack position , focus on where I want to go. (big one))… I love the overall intention to have a smooth ride… I do so much better when I am totally in the moment… my mind wanders and the smoothness disappears. Clear Mind = Awesome Flow. Thank You

    Reply
  2. bradley says:

    I really like the fact that you mentioned having fun as an option. I let myself get too concerned with simply covering some miles last week and sucked the life out of the ride. Today, my intention was to have fun. Ride was great. I smiled alot and also felt like I ripped the whole ride.

    Reply
  3. jack says:

    im a 48 yr old white water kayaker/ mountain biker. I pedal a customized trek remedy 7 2012 with 2 rings, 22 and 36 race face bash, blacksire stinger stops chain dropp. i crash too much and i want too many bikes. he he. this 18 month beginner needs lots of instruction. thank you!

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  4. jack says:

    today i rode and my intension was weight on pedals and smooth cornering.this stuff pays exponential dividens on the trail. evrything i did was better.its more fun to improve by focusing on what im suposse to do verses focusing on how bad i desire improvement. thank you for a better ride!

    Reply

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