Winter Program Tips: What to Do When You Can’t Mountain Bike.

Winter Program Tips: What to Do When You Can’t Mountain Bike.  by BetterRide Head Coach Andy Winohradsky

So its winter-time. And one bummer about winter is that, as mountain bikers, access to our sport, and more specificity, our trails, will be limited – sometimes altogether eliminated! But even if we are forced to spend extended time off the bike (I plan on covering some winter-riding topics in the future), there are still plenty of things we can do to maintain our riding skill-set.

As a betterride coach, I’m not necessarily concerned with riders simply riding their mountain bikes, but I’m concerned with riders riding well. The following will address some off-bike activities, and how and why they can help maintain – and possibly even improve – a rider’s technical skill-set over the winter.

Since MTB’ing is typically a summertime activity, and also understanding that the idea of actually practicing technical skills (as in drilling and methodically applying techniques), versus simply going out and riding the bike, is foreign to most riders, its no surprise that the idea of purposely and consciously maintaining our technical skill-set over the winter isn’t a widely discussed topic. Most riders that I know jump into the typical winter-time cyclist’s regime of riding the road bike, the stationary trainer, and hitting the gym, accepting the fact that during those first real mountain bike rides of spring, they’ll be rusty, scared, and possibly crash they’re brains out. While the above work-out activities definitely can provide certain benefits, they really won’t do squat for a MTB’ers technical prowess on the bike.

As anyone who has received Betterride instruction will know, being technically sound on the bicycle (using correct body position, proper use of vision, subtle weight shifts, accurate timing, among others) will get a rider a lot further and keep the rider a lot more safe then simply being physically fit. So assuming that we are maintaining a decent level of fitness, wouldn’t it make sense to tend to our technical riding skills over doing-the-hamster at spin class?

So how do we improve our skills on the bike without actually riding it? There are many activities we can do – some work better then others – that will help to keep us sharp until riding season heats up.

O.k., first, I do understand that winter-time is the off-season for us mountain bikers, and if you take your riding fairly seriously – which you probably do if you’ve read this far – then spending a little time off the bike will actually be good for you, both mentally and physically. This doesn’t mean you can lay on the couch for six months, watching football and hockey, stuffing your face with chips and cheap beer (although this author does highly recommend a couple days of this!). We need to stay active.

As I stated above, the typical cyclist’s winter regime can have its benefits, however, even though there are some great work-out programs out there and some very adept athletic trainers, I have yet to see a program that is nearly as multi-dimensional and all encompassing – both mentally and physically – as MTB’ing on technical terrain. When choosing an off-bike winter activity, its important that we chose something that provides us with the “mental work-out” that is similar to the on-bike experience.

Mountain biking is an incredibly mentally taxing activity. We are constantly making adjustments and corrections, we are often fighting fatigue, we often need to deal with emotions such as frustration or even anger. Even though, on the surface, many sports or activities may look night and day different from that of mountain biking, many of the mental challenges and mind-body awareness and connections can be quite similar. These are the type of activities we need to get involved with – activities that will engage us in a manner similar to that of riding the mountin bike. Example: I’ll take a day of hard snowboarding over a day at the gym, in regards to improving my technical bike riding, anytime (again, assuming that I am also doing something to maintain a decent level of fitness). The hidden benefits of snowboarding and its similarities to MTB’ing are countless: issues of balance, dealing with fear, fighting to maintain technique as fatigue sets in – simply being outside and exposed to the elements all day, eating the proper foods, drinking enough water, etc.

I consistently see a difference in riders, beginners or other-wise, in their abilities to learn and/or adapt on the bicycle in relation to their athletic participation outside of bike riding. Those that participate, or have participated, in activities where they compete (even with themselves) and regularly deal with challenges and “athletic problems” where they are engaged both physically and mentally in the activity, are already a step up on those that may put long ours into training, but often they involve sitting on a stationary bike and watching t.v (winter), or pumping out reps (even with fairly dynamic work-outs) at the gym. (if you’re able to have an imaginary conversation with yourself for 40 mi of that 50 mi road ride, how mentally engaged where you in that work-out? Did you make any mental gains?

A few good ones: as many of you are already aware, skiing and snowboarding are great for this. Not only do they require a mind-body awareness in a challenging environment, but they also give us a sense of speed and force us to use our vision (possibly the most important aspect of riding a MTB) in a similar way that we do on a bicycle. Sports such as racquetball, basketball, or martial arts (to name a few) are also excellent for our riding because, again, they will force us to be “athletic problem solvers” and engage our mind-body awareness. To me, these sports have more in common with riding a mountain bike on difficult technical terrain then going for a road bike ride for the shear mental discipline and mind-body awareness that they require. These sports require that you complete incredibly difficult technical tasks while fully exerting yourself physically – just as you do while piloting your MTB over difficult terrain.

If you are already active in an off-season activity such as the above mentioned, good job. Keep it up. If you’re not, and perhaps you never really have been, right now – winter – in an excellent time to start! I guarantee that you will come across many “happy accidents” and discoveries that will carry over into your bike riding.

A bit more:

I am constantly amazed at the amount of high-level cyclists (and other athletes) that I come across that bring lessons that they’ve learned or tools that they’ve acquired from different athletic disciplines into they’re riding (ex: Last winter I learned in yoga that if you … and this is the same as that …” or “Last winter I took kick-boxing and learned … and this is the same …”). I know that I regularly take “lessons” that I learned from high school and college athletics and apply them to my riding today (and that high school and college stuff happened around 100 yrs ago).

A former colleague of mine and a competitive World Cup racer, and I had a conversation last summer about the benefits of having a well rounded athletic background. We both agreed that many of the lessons – and failures – that we had experienced in athletic competition previous to racing bicycles at a high level was crucial to all the successes we’d had in racing (he’d obviously had more of those then I had) and how many of todays young racers don’t have those type of backgrounds and therefore have difficulty overcoming some of the challenges they are faced with in taking their racing to a high level.

In conclusion: it is winter-time, enjoy a little time away from your bicycle, but stay active, and be intelligent in your choice of activities. Go out and compete with yourself (and/or others) and learn something about yourself as an athlete (in success and failure!). Keep that competitive mind and your mind-body connection sharp even if you aren’t putting in an extensive amount of time on the bike. If done correctly, these gains will carry over into your riding season.

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9 replies
  1. Geoffrey says:

    I’m very confused. You speak of “weather” and “winter” and “seasons.” I do not know these words. Right now, I’m going to do some skills training in the parking lot: it’s 77 and sunny. :) :) :)

    Enjoying San Diego,

    Geoffrey

    Reply
  2. Ned says:

    I love it! As we get an average 350in. of snow where I live if you don’t do something you’d go nuts. Snowboarding is always fun and I avoid “real” competition in it to keep it that way. I think it helps me refocus for bike racing too a it helps keep everything in perspective. I also picked up aikido this winter and WOW does it help with your body awareness. Between that stuff and hitting the gym I’m looking forward to my most productive year of DH racing yet. I might even beat Gene this year!

    Reply
  3. Chris Cornelison says:

    I started cross-country skiing a couple of years ago, and have found no other winter sport that is a better compliment to mountain biking. Vision is critical for good balance, getting those skinny skis around corners, and climbing steep stuff without stalling out. As for balance, I don’t think you can get any better practice, especially if you skate ski. Having to balance 100% of your body weight on a single leg attached to a platform narrower than your foot which is prone to slipping in all directions (forward, back, left, and right), is the ultimate balance improver. The more I learn about the sport, the more I realize how technical it is, and that the only way to tap into the fitness you have is with clean, efficient technique. Like mountain biking, it provides a lifetime of learning and improvement opportunities.

    Reply
  4. Michael Wolf says:

    Balance training is always a great indoor / winter training tool for cyclist and everyday life.
    Don’t under estimate the benefits of being on a balance board each morning….triggers the entire body better than coffee

    Reply
  5. JimV says:

    Andy,
    Do you think snowboarding carries over better than downhill skiing? (I agree with Chris on his observation about xc ski; a lot of our trails our xc ski in the winter and mtb in the summer)
    -Jim

    Reply
  6. Gene says:

    Downhill skiing is just as good as snowboarding. Andy mentioned snowboarding as that is his favorite form of winter recreation. He does a lot of back country riding which is heck of a workout too!

    Reply
  7. Bryan says:

    Come ride Lenzsport Ski Bikes w/ me @ Winter Park! The only mountain w/ demos. the new Launch is unreal. Cross training is sick and sooooo much fun. Once you progress to black mogals and trees, you won’t go back to skiing or snowboard.

    Reply

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